Flags of the world (Google eBook)

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The National geographic society, 1917 - Flags - 2 pages
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Page 297 - that the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.
Page 303 - Woe be to the man or group of men that seeks to stand in our way in this day of high resolution when every principle we hold dearest is to be vindicated and made secure for the salvation of the nations.
Page 304 - I know you well. You are the man who worked in the swelter of yesterday straightening out the tangle of that farmer's homestead in Idaho, or perhaps you found the mistake in that Indian contract in Oklahoma, or helped to clear that patent for the hopeful inventor in New York, or pushed the opening of that new ditch in Colorado, or made that mine in Illinois more safe, or brought relief to the old soldier in Wyoming. No matter; whichever one of these beneficent individuals you may happen to be, I...
Page 344 - We have met the enemy and they are ours; two ships, two brigs, one schooner and one sloop.
Page 307 - That from and after the fourth day of July next, the Flag of the United States be thirteen horizontal stripes, alternate red and white ; that the union have twenty stars, white in a blue field.
Page 306 - That from and after May 1, 1795. the flag of the United States be fifteen stripes, alternate red and white; and that the union be fifteen stars, white in a blue field.
Page 307 - That on the admission of every new state into the Union, one star be added to the union of the flag ; and that such addition shall take effect on the fourth of July next succeeding such admission.
Page 289 - ... we gave great joy to them, without knowing or intending it ; for on that day, the day which gave being to the new army, but before the proclamation came to hand, we had hoisted the union flag in compliment to the United Colonies. But, behold, it was received in Boston as a token of the deep impression the speech had made upon us, and as a signal of submission.
Page 320 - Any of these signals may be answered from the vessel as follows : In the day-time, by waving a flag, a handkerchief, a hat, or even the hand ; at night, by firing a rocket, a blue light, or a gun, or by showing a light over the ship's gunwale for a short time and then concealing it.
Page 320 - Two flags, a white and a red, waved at the same time on shore by day, or two lights, a white and a red, slowly swung at the same time, or a blue pyrotechnic light burned by night, will signify, " Do not attempt to land in your own boats. It is impossible.

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