Pinocchio's Adventures in Wonderland: Translated from the Italian (Google eBook)

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Jordan, Marsh & Company, 1898 - Conduct of life - 212 pages
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Contents

I
9
II
13
III
17
IV
23
V
26
VI
29
VII
32
VIII
36
XIX
89
XX
94
XXI
98
XXII
101
XXIII
105
XXIV
112
XXV
120
XXVI
124

IX
40
X
44
XI
48
XII
53
XIII
59
XIV
64
XV
68
XVI
72
XVII
76
XVIII
83
XXVII
128
XXVIII
136
XXIX
143
XXX
152
XXXI
159
XXXII
167
XXXIII
175
XXXIV
185
XXXV
194
XXXVI
200

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Page 134 - There was something in the moody and dogged silence of this pertinacious companion that was mysterious and appalling. It was soon fearfully accounted for. On mounting a rising ground, which brought the figure of his fellow-traveller in relief against the sky, gigantic...
Page 10 - ... surface. Just, however, as he was going to give the first stroke he remained with his arm suspended in the air, for he heard a very small voice saying imploringly, 'Do not strike me so hard!
Page 18 - No one answered. He then proceeded to carve the nose; but no sooner had he made it than it began to grow. And it grew, and grew, and grew until in a few minutes it had become an immense nose that seemed as if it would never end. Poor Geppetto tired himself out with cutting it off; but the more he cut and shortened it, the longer did that impertinent nose become! The mouth was not even completed when it began to laugh and deride him. 'Stop laughing!' said Geppetto provoked; but he might as well have...
Page 46 - His beard was as black as ink, and so long that it reached from his chin to the ground. I need only say that he trod upon it when he walked. His mouth was as big as an oven, and his eyes were like two lanterns of red glass with lights burning inside them. He carried a large whip made of snakes and foxes' tails twisted together, which he cracked constantly.
Page 24 - until I have told you a great truth." "Tell it me, then, and be quick about it." "Woe to those boys who rebel against their parents and run away from home. They will never come to any good in the world, and sooner or later they will repent bitterly.

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