Analytical psychology: its theory and practice: the Tavistock lectures

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Pantheon Books, 1968 - Psychology - 224 pages
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"... these lectures provide an extremely clear, readable, and at times amusing exposition of Jung's theories. In them Jung not only describes his views on the structure of the mind, giving lucid accounts of his psychological types, of the personal and collective unconscious and of archetypes, but also explains vividly his techniques of dream analysis and active imagination and the role played by transference in analytic therapy." -- Charles Rycroft, The New York Review of Books "...Jung was a charismatic personality: and this volume bears witness not only to his erudition and his originality but also to his charm and his persuasiveness." -- The Times Literary Supplement (London) "This, surely, is the most lucid, simple and orderly introduction to the basic principles and methods of the Jungian science of the psyche that has yet been offered to the public." -- Joseph Campbell, Book World

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Contents

LECTURE TWO
39
LECTURE THREE
78
LECTURE FOUR
114
Copyright

2 other sections not shown

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About the author (1968)

The Swiss-born Carl Jung was one of the most famous of modern psychologists and psychiatrists. The son of a minister, Jung originally set out to study archaeology. He switched to medicine and began practicing psychiatry in Basel after receiving his degree in 1902. Jung first met Sigmund Freud in 1907 when he became his foremost associate and disciple. The break came with the publication of Jung's Psychology of the Unconscious (1912), which did not follow Freud's theories of the libido and the unconscious. Jung eventually rejected Freud's system of psychoanalysis for his own "analytic psychology." This emphasizes present conflicts rather than those from childhood; it also takes into account the conflict arising from what Jung called the "collective unconscious"---evolutionary and cultural factors determining individual development. Considered as a "deserter" and a "mystic" by Freud's followers, Jung's theories have continued to be the topic of heated discussions. Jung invented the association word test and contributed the word complex to psychology, and first described the "introvert" and "extrovert" types. Jung's interest in the human psyche, past and present, led him to study mythology, alchemy, oriental religions and philosophies, and traditional peoples. Later he became interested in parapsychology and the occult. He thought that unidentified flying objects (UFOs) might be a psychological projection of modern people's anxieties. Jung was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine and received an honorary D. Sc. by Oxford University, the first psychologist to receive such an honor in England. He also received honorary degrees from Harvard University, the University of Calcutta, the Banaras Hindu University, the University of Allahabad in India, and the University of Geneva.

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