Grose's Classical Dictionary of Th Vulgar Tongue: Revised and Corrected, with the Addition of Numerous Slang Phrases, Collected from Tried Authorites (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Sherwood, Neely, and Jones, 1823 - English language - 245 pages
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Brush up on your pre-Victorian street slang.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xxiv - To cut with a knife, or To cut a piece of wood, is perfectly free from vulgarity, because it is perfectly common : but to cut an acquaintance is not quite unexceptionable, because it is not perfectly common or intelligible, and has hardly yet escaped out of the limits of slang phraseology. I should hardly therefore use the word in this sense without putting it in italics as a license of expression, to be received cum grano salis.
Page viii - French, a speech compact thirty years since of English and a great number of odd words of their own devising, without all order or reason ; and yet, such is it as none but themselves are able to understand. The first deviser thereof was hanged by the neck a just reward no doubt for his deserts, and a common end to all of that profession.
Page viii - Profitable for gentlemen, lawyers, merchants, citizens, farmers, masters of households, and all sorts of servants, to marke, and delightfull for men to reade.
Page xxiv - The proper force of words lies not in the words themselves, but in their application. A word may be a finesounding word, of an unusual length, and very imposing from its learning and novelty, and yet in the connection in which it is introduced may be quite .pointless and irrelevant. It is not pomp or pretension, but the adaptation of the expression to the idea, that clenches a writer's meaning: - as it is not the size or glossiness of the materials, but their being fitted each to its place, that...
Page xxv - A word may be a fine-sounding word, of an unusual length, and very imposing from its learning and novelty, and yet in the connection in which it is introduced may be quite pointless and irrelevant. It is not pomp or pretension, but the adaptation of the expression to the idea, that clenches a writer's meaning as it is not the size or glossiness of the materials, but their being fitted each to its place, that gives strength to the arch ; or as the pegs and nails are as necessary to the support...
Page xxx - In the one he received, and from the other paid ; and this too with a want of circumspection which may be readily supposed from- such a mode of book-keeping. His losses on this occasion roused his latent talents: with a good classical education he united a fine taste for drawing, which he now began again to cultivate; and encouraged by his -friends, he undertook the work from which he derived both profit and reputation : his Views of Antiquities in England and Wales, which he first began to publish...

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