Fabricating the Keynesian Revolution: Studies of the Inter-war Literature on Money, the Cycle, and Unemployment

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 28, 1999 - Business & Economics - 380 pages
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It is a commonly held belief that, in 1936, Keynes's General Theory ushered in a new era in economic thought, with faith in the free market being replaced by reliance on systematic government intervention as a means of keeping the economy on an even keel. This book surveys the writings of a large number of economists in the inter-war years and argues that the "Keynesian Revolution" is a myth, and that the "new economics" was a careful and selective synthesis of an "old economics" which had been developing for twenty years or more.
  

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Contents

An Overview
3
The Austrian Theory of the Trade Cycle
27
The Macrodynamics of the Stockholm School
51
Lavington Pigou and Robertson
79
The Monetary Element in the Cambridge Tradition
105
The Treatise on Money and Related Contributions
130
British Discussions of Unemployment
155
American Macroeconomics between World War I and
181
American Macroeconomics in the Early 1930s
213
The General Theory
247
The Classics and Mr Keynes
277
ISLM
303
Conclusion
320
References
341
Author Index
367
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