The Senses and the Intellect (Google eBook)

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Appleton, 1894 - Mind and body - 703 pages
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Contents

Divisions of the Cerebral Grey Matter
34
Summary of detailed functions
40
Every part of the Nervous System in relation with every other
54
Reguras of Spontaneous Activity
59
Structure of CrossStriated or Skeletal Muscles
60
Classification of Feelings of Movement
78
PACE
79
Examples of the Dead Strain
86
Discrimination of degrees and modes of muscular exertion
92
Sensationsof the five Senses
101
General or Common Sensibility
107
Cramp or spasm its physical nature and mental character
114
Summary of the Physiology of digestion
120
Nausea and Disgust
126
Suffocation
132
Circulation and Nutrition 17 Thirst Starvation pleasures of pure animal existence
133
Heat and Cold 18 Physical effects of heat and cold Sensation of Cold
134
Sensation of Heat Marked illustration of the law of Relativity
136
Sensations of Nerve 20 The nerve substance in itself has characteristic sensibilities
137
Nervous fatigue Depression of tone
138
Healthy and Fresh Condition of the Nerve Tissue General ex hilaration of mental tone Influence of stimulating drugs
139
State of Drowsiness 23 As au adjunct of sleep the state is of the nature of voluminous pleasure
141
The exaggerated form of socalled excitement
142
Electric and Voltaic shocksFaradays MagnetoElectric cur rents
143
2G Electrical state of the Atmosphere
144
Sense op Taste 1 Bodies acting on the sense of Taste
146
Organ of Taste description of the Tongue
148
Local distribution of the sensibility of the tongue
150
Mode of action in taste
151
Sensations of Taste complex sensibility of the tongue
152
Order of Classification
153
Relishes ib 8 Disgusts
154
Bitter tastes
155
Saline tastes
156
Alkaline tastes ib 13 Sour or acid tastes ib 14 Astringent tastes
157
Objects of Smell
158
Production of odours
160
description of the Nose 158 160
161
Action of odoursthe presence of oxygen necessary to smell
163
their classification
164
Fresh odours
165
Close or suffocating odours
166
sensation of sweetness
167
Bad odours
168
Pungent odours
169
Appetizing odours ib 15 Flavour
170
Sense op Touch
171
Objects of Touoh
173
the Skin
174
Functions and vital properties of the skin
178
I Emotional SensationsSoft Touch
181
Pungent and painful sensations of touch
182
Other painful sensations of the skinTickling Exception to the law of stimulus Chafing of the skin
183
II Sensations of Temperature Intellectual
185
1
187
2 Sensations of Pressure
191
Weight Pressure Resistance Elasticity Roughness and Smoothness increase of sensibility by movement
192
Qualities of Extension Size Form Movement by itself inadequate to give the Notion of Extended Matter or of Space How the sense of Touch contribu...
196
Distance Direction Situation Form
201
Accompaniment of activity in the senses generally
203
Touch concerned in handicraft operations
204
Objects of Hearing
205
Sweetness
213
Suddenness
215
Volume or Quantity
216
Waxing and waning of sound
217
Discord and Harmony ib 11 Timbre
218
Articulate sounds Helmholtzs explanation of the vowel sounds ib 13 Distance
220
The Ear
221
Direction ib 15 Duration of an impression of sound
222
The Eye
224
the distinction between Succession and the simultaneous or Coexistence in Space
254
Apparent size exceeding delicacy of our discrimination of retinal magnitude
257
Distance or varying remoteness
258
Extent of the intellectual imagery derived through the eye
259
Exercise and Repose
261
CHAPTER III
265
The Reflex Automatic or Involuntary Actions defined their
267
The Primitive Combined Movements
281
Law of Harmony of state of the muscular system
288
Movements and effects diffused under Feeling Mailer
291
Muscles connected with the movements of the Mouth
298
The manifestations of feeling considered with reference to
307
PAGE
313
Exception presented by the Narcotic Stimulants
314
Action of the parts of the ear in the sensation of sound 209
317
Spontaneity by itself insufficient Voluntary command of
320
Movements of the involuntary muscles
326
THE APPETITES
327
Fundamental attributes of Thought or Intelligence
335
CHAPTER I
341
Conditions regulating the pace of Acquisition
349
Transition from the Actual to the Ideal
354
Appetite a species of Volition Enumeration of Appetites 200
358
The tendency of an idea to become the reality is an active power
360
Association of sensations of the same sense with one another
366
Outline Formsscientific arbitrary
373
The vastness and complicacy of the sense acquisitions could
379
Distance and Magnitude imply other organs than the
388
Extension the result of an Association of mental effects
394
Related facts in Visual perception according to Wheatstone
405
Perception of Solidity implied in the perception of distance
413
Associated differences in the Muscular Peelings Hamiltons
419
The element of Feeling may be allied with objects
422
Love of money passion for business formalities
428
Associations of Volition
436
External objects affect us through a Plurality of senses
442
Successions
448
Successions of Cause and Effect Case of human actions as causes
451
Acquisition of Vocal music
458
Business or Practical Life
470
Composite stream of our past life
477
AGREEMENTLAW OF SIMILARITY
486
The ear as concerned in Language
508
Properties common to sensations of different senses
516
Natural objects identified on their scientific properties Chemical
523
Various modes of Succession Of identities some are real others
530
Newtons discovery of universal gravita
536
the inductive process demands the power of Simi
544
transfer or extension of properties to new cases
550
Persuasion
558
Some of the Fine Arts involve the intellect largely
564
Business acquisitions
570
COMPOUND ASSOCIATION
577
the succession of Order in Time
583
The Element op Peeling
589
Concurrence of other suggesting circumstances with an object
596
Contrasts are often accompanied with Emotion
602
Fulfilment of the conditions of grammar etc Necessity of
610
States of Hearing the result of a combining effort
616
Elementary emotions of human nature must be experienced
619
The methods of representation
625
Region of practical inventions The turn for experimenting
631
Terror Anger
637
The artists standard is the feeling of the effect produced
643
B Pleasure and Pain
654
Darwins three principles The first entitled The principle
670
Assertion
679
Question as to the intuitive source of our knowledge Innate elements
685
Self The 3oPersonal ily Inheritance from the past may enter
693
Reid Dugald Stewart Hamilton Samcel Bailey Herbert
701

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 517 - If music be the food of love, play on, Give me excess of it; that, surfeiting, The appetite may sicken and so die.— That strain again;— it had a dying fall; O, it came o'er my ear like the sweet south, That breathes upon a bank of violets, Stealing and giving odour.— Enough; no more; 'Tis not so sweet now as it was before.
Page 626 - THE small Town of Dunbar stands, high and windy, looking down over its herring-boats, over its grim old Castle now much honeycombed, — on one of those projecting rock-promontories with which that shore of the Frith of Forth is niched and vandyked, as far as the eye can reach.
Page 303 - declares, that " a very considerable number of the facts may be brought under the following principle, namely, that states of pleasure are connected with an increase, and states of pain with an abatement, of some, or all, of the vital functions.
Page 626 - Oliver Cromwell's Army, on Monday 2d of September 1650, stands ranked, with its tents and Town behind it, — in very forlorn circumstances. This now is all the ground that Oliver is lord of in Scotland. His Ships lie in the offing, with biscuit and transport for him ; but visible elsewhere in the Earth no help. Landward as you look...
Page 422 - To a dog, for instance, in •whom the sense of smell is so acute, all odors seem, in themselves, to be indifferent. In Touch or Feeling the same analogy holds good, and within itself; for in this case, where the sense is diffused throughout the body, the subjective and objective vary in their proportions at different parts. The parts most subjectively sensible, those chiefly susceptible of pain and pleasure, furnish precisely the obtusest organs of touch; and the acutest organs of touch do not possess,...
Page 558 - Persuasion implies that some course of conduct shall be so described, or expressed, as to coincide, or be identified, with the active impulses of the individuals addressed, and thereby command their adoption of it by the force of their own natural dispositions.
Page iii - ALEXANDER BAIN'S WORKS. THE SENSES AND THE INTELLECT. By ALEXANDER BAIN. LL. D., Professor of Logic in the University of Aberdeen. 8vo. Cloth, $5.00. The object of this treatise Is to give a full and systematic account of two principal divisions of the science of mind— the senses and the intellect.
Page 399 - We are incapable of discussing the existence of an independent material world ; the very act is a contradiction. We can speak only of a world presented to our own minds.
Page 489 - In the perfect identity between a present and a past impression, the past is recovered and fused with the present, instantaneously and surely. So quick and unfaltering is the process that we lose sight of it altogether (!) ; we are scarcely made aware of the existence of a reproductive link of similarity in the chain of sequence. When I look at the full moon, I am instantly impressed with the state arising from all my former impressions of her disc added together " (" Senses and Intellect,
Page 437 - Accordingly, in the absence of precautions, the time that must elapse before chickens have acquired enough control over their muscles to enable them to give evidence as to their instinctive power of interpreting what they see and hear, would suffice to let in the contention that the eye and the ear...

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