The Republic

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Penguin, 2003 - Philosophy - 416 pages
51 Reviews
Plato’s 'Republic' is widely acknowledged as the cornerstone of Western philosophy. Presented in the form of a dialogue between Socrates and three different interlocutors, it is an enquiry into the notion of a perfect community and the ideal individual within it. During the conversation other questions are raised - what is goodness; what is reality; what is knowledge? 'The Republic' also addresses the purpose of education and the role of both women and men as ‘guardians’ of the people. With remarkable lucidity and deft use of allegory, Plato arrives at a depiction of a state bound by harmony and ruled by ‘philosopher kings’. Desmond Lee’s translation of 'The Republic' has come to be regarded as a classic in its own right. His introduction discusses contextual themes such as Plato’s disillusionment with Athenian politics and the trial of Socrates. This new edition also features a revised bibliography.
  

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Review: The Republic

User Review  - Vincent Russo - Goodreads

I remember trying to read this quite a long time ago, but never having been able to finish it. I will say that for the time of writing, this text is most definitely insightful and philosophically ... Read full review

Review: The Republic

User Review  - Charbel - Goodreads

I don't know how to review this book, but I guess I should begin by saying that I got through it without much difficulty. I thought it would be a work so complex that I could only understand a simple ... Read full review

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Contents

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Page xviii - I was forced, in fact, to the belief that the only hope of finding justice for society or for the individual lay in true philosophy, and that mankind will have no respite from trouble until either real philosophers gain political power or politicians become by some miracle true philosophers.

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About the author (2003)

Plato (c. 427-347 b.c.) founded the Academy in Athens, the prototype of all Western universities, and wrote more than twenty philosophical dialogues.

Desmond Lee (1908-1993) taught for many years at Cambridge University and also translated Plato's Timaeus and Critiasfor Penguin Classics.

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