Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 31 (Google eBook)

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W. Blackwood, 1832
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Page 482 - But know this, that if the goodman of the house had known in what watch the thief would come, he would have watched, and would not have suffered his house to be broken up, 44 Therefore be ye also ready: for in such an hour as ye think not the Son of man cometh.
Page 29 - All sacrifices do but speed forward that great day, when the knowledge of the Lord shall cover the earth as the waters cover the sea.
Page 264 - Twas thus, by the cave of the mountain afar, While his harp rung symphonious, a hermit began ; No more with himself or with nature at war, He thought as a sage, though he felt as a man.
Page 282 - And send him foiled and bellowing back, for all his ivory horn ; To leave the subtle sworder-fish of bony blade forlorn ; And for the ghastly-grinning shark to laugh his jaws to scorn ; To leap down on the kraken's back, where 'mid Norwegian isles He lies, a lubber anchorage for sudden...
Page 281 - tis at a white heat now: The bellows ceased, the flames decreased though on the forge's brow The little flames still fitfully play through the sable mound, And fitfully you still may see the grim smiths ranking round, All clad in leathern panoply, their broad hands only bare: Some rest upon their sledges here, some work the windlass there.
Page 557 - Salamis ! Their azure arches through the long expanse More deeply purpled meet his mellowing glance, And tenderest tints, along their summits driven, Mark his gay course and own the hues of heaven ; Till, darkly shaded from the land and deep, Behind his Delphian cliff he sinks to sleep.
Page 153 - High o'er the slain the great Achilles stands, Begirt with heroes and surrounding bands; And thus aloud, while all the host attends: Princes and leaders! countrymen and friends! Since now at length the powerful will of Heaven The dire destroyer to our arm has given, Is not Troy fall'n already?
Page 261 - Heaven o'er my head seems made of molten brass, The earth of flaming sulphur, yet I am not mad. I am acquainted with sad misery As the tanned galley-slave is with his oar; Necessity makes me suffer constantly, And custom makes it easy.
Page 282 - King, and royal craftsmen we ; Strike in, strike in, the sparks begin to dull their rustling red! Our hammers ring with sharper din, our work will soon be sped; Our anchor soon must change his bed of fiery rich array...
Page 442 - To be bred in a place of estimation; to see nothing low and sordid from one's infancy; to be taught to respect one's self; to be habituated to the censorial inspection of the public eye; to look early to public opinion ; to stand upon such elevated ground as to be enabled to take a large view of the wide-spread and infinitely diversified combinations of men and affairs in a large society...

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