The Tyranny of Printers: Newspaper Politics in the Early American Republic

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University of Virginia Press, Nov 1, 2002 - History - 517 pages
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Although frequently attacked for their partisanship and undue political influence, the American media of today are objective and relatively ineffectual compared to their counterparts of two hundred years ago. From the late eighteenth to the late nineteenth century, newspapers were the republic's central political institutions, working components of the party system rather than commentators on it.

The Tyranny of Printers narrates the rise of this newspaper-based politics, in which editors became the chief party spokesmen and newspaper offices often served as local party headquarters. Beginning when Thomas Jefferson enlisted a Philadelphia editor to carry out his battle with Alexander Hamilton for the soul of the new republic (and got caught trying to cover it up), the centrality of newspapers in political life gained momentum after Jefferson's victory in 1800, which was widely credited to a superior network of papers. Jeffrey L. Pasley tells the rich story of this political culture and its culmination in Jacksonian democracy, enlivening his narrative with accounts of the colorful but often tragic careers of individual editors.

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"The Tyranny of Printers": Newspaper Politics in the Early American Republic
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JSTOR: "The Tyranny of Printers": Newspaper Politics in the Early ...
"The Tyranny of Printers": Newspaper Politics in the Early American Republic. John K. Alexander. Journal of the Early Republic, Vol. 21, No. 4, 714-717. ...
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"The Tyranny of Printers"
• Winner of the History Division Book Prize from the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. • Visit this book's companion web site ...
www.upress.virginia.edu/ books/ pasley.html

upword: BOOKS: The Tyranny of Printers
I just finished a fascinating history book, The Tyranny of Printers: Newspaper Politics in the Early American Republic, by Jeffrey Pasley (a history prof at ...
upword.blogspot.com/ 2005/ 06/ books-tyranny-of-printers.html

Tyranny of Printers companion web site
"Should be read by many of the great number who are now exposed to the conservative biography of Adams by David mccullough. . . . This is a sprightly and ...
pasleybrothers.com/ newspols/

"The Tyranny of Printers": Newspaper Politics in the Early ...
"The Tyranny of Printers": Newspaper Politics in the Early American Republic. (book review) from History: Review of New Books in Reference provided by Find ...
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H-Net Review: Debra R. Van Tuyll on Politics and the American ...
dot. Search Reviews Advanced Search · Reviews Home · Subscribe to H-Review · Info. for Publishers · Review Guidelines · Review Standards ...
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| Book Review | The American Historical Review, 108.1 | The ...
Joanne B. Freeman. Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic. New Haven: Yale University Press. 2001. Pp. xxiv, 376. $29.95. ...
www.historycooperative.org/ journals/ ahr/ 108.1/ br_48.html

Printers
PRINTERS. Printers were the intellectual elite of the early American working class. They needed to be literate, unlike most other artisans and laborers, ...
www.americanforeignrelations.com/ Po-Pr/ Printers.html

Joanne B. Freeman - The Culture of Politics: The Politics of ...
Copyright © 2004 by The Pennsylvania State University Press. All rights reserved. Journal of Policy History 16.2 (2004) 137-143 ...
muse.jhu.edu/ journals/ journal_of_policy_history/ v016/ 16.2freeman.html

About the author (2002)

Jeffrey L. Pasley, a former staff writer for the New Republic, is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Missouri.

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