Walking the Forest with Chico Mendes: Struggle for Justice in the Amazon (Google eBook)

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University of Texas Press, Dec 1, 2007 - Biography & Autobiography - 187 pages
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Contents

I WAS THERE
19
A VERY DIFFICULT BEGINNING
44
RUBBER TAPERS A CENTURYS STRUGGLE
64
A GENOCIDAL OCCUPATION
89
OUR VICTORY DEPENDS ON OUR ORGANIZATION AND DISCIPLINE
101
A LITTLE ABOUT MY FRIEND CHICO MENDES
122
AN INTERVIEW WITH CHICO MENDES
147
CHICOS DREAM
154
AUTHORS AND EDITORS NOTES
165
EDITORS BIBLIOGRAPHY
175
INDEX
177
Copyright

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Page 26 - ... never know. I've done it before. We can reverse if you like, it's all the same to me. You go on up first and I'll meet you in ten minutes. My room's last on the right, or from the back stairway it's first on the left. O anyway you'll know it's mine, won't you, from the way it smells.
Page 13 - And many times we would become a little taken aback, encountering difficulty making a response. At the end of 1984, beginning of 1985, an idea came up at the union of rubber tappers of Xapuri — our idea, to organize the first national meeting of rubber tappers in Brasilia. Why Brasilia? Because Brasilia serves as the forum for decisions at the national level. And because in Brasilia the authorities had, until that moment, considered Amazonia a vacuum with nobody living there.
Page 13 - Beginning from this point we discovered the idea of creating extractive reserves in the Amazon. This would be the real agrarian reform for Amazonia that we wanted, because we rubber tappers never fought to be the owners or property holders of land. What we want is that the state own the land while the rubber tappers maintain usufruct rights over it. And so this very good idea emerged. After the meeting, government agencies released this idea all over Brazil and even to environmental organizations...
Page 18 - The objectives of many First World environmental organizations focus primarily on resource conservation and the technical means through which this can be achieved. But the agrarian question that produces the environmental degradation remains largely undiscussed, at least in US environmental circles. Their plans have a timbre that is usually technocratic and politically 'neutral' — that is, conservative in content.

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