Anglo-American Shipbuilding in World War II: A Geographical Perspective

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Praeger, Jan 1, 2004 - Business & Economics - 223 pages
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The expansion of the shipbuilding industry in Britain and the United States between 1938 and 1945 was one of the greatest economic feats in history. This study examines in detail the unprecedented growth both in total industrial capacity and that of individual shipyards. Lindberg and Todd go beyond the normal descriptive historical account of this expansion to analyze it through the application of a geographical perspective. Specifically, they apply the geographic concepts of clustering and agglomeration to the merchant and naval shipbuilding industries of both nations during this vital era.

Beginning with the emergence of a modern shipbuilding capability in the late nineteenth century, the authors examine how these geographic concepts were progressively implemented in both the United States and Britain as a result of new technological demands on navies as well as changing geostrategic considerations. While World War I marked the initial large-scale example of clustering/agglomeration, the interwar period would witness a quick demise of both the industry and the major shipyard agglomerations. This important work explains how, as a result of the war, the governments and the shipbuilding industries of two nations were able to reconstitute and greatly expand their capabilities in the face of ever-increasing demands for both warships and merchant vessels.

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About the author (2004)

MICHAEL LINDBERG is an Associate Professor of Geography at Elmhurst College in Elmhurst, Illinois. His interests include naval and military geography, geopolitical analysis and naval history. He is currently a LCDR in the US Naval Sea Cadet Corps. He is author of Geographical Impact on Coastal Defense Navies: Brown, Green and Blue-Water Fleets and Shipbuilding Industries (both with Daniel Todd) and The Persian Gulf Naval Arms Race: Myth or Reality?.

DANIEL TODD is a Professor in the Geography Department at the University of Manitoba. He is the author of nine books, including two with Michael Lindberg, and numerous journal articles. His research interests include economic geography with a strong concentration in East Asian topics.

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