Eighteenth-century Ceramics: Products for a Civilised Society

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Manchester University Press, 1999 - Antiques & Collectibles - 236 pages
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Numerous publications describe well the provenance of eighteenth-century ceramics. This book focuses instead on the producers and consumers of these new material goods. It explains the economic conditions, the new scientific knowledge, the social and cultural transformations which formed these products. "Eighteenth-Century Ceramics" places British wares in a European context. The book makes clear that British delftwares, porcelains and creamwares were produced principally by middle-class entrepreneurs for middle-class consumers. Although influenced by the continental manufactories, British ceramics developed characteristics which reinforced the values and aspirations of a complex group of people who formed the commercial, professional and new industrial middle classes. The author investigates the impact refined ceramic wares made on the social practices and imaginative lives of eighteenth-century society.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
The European context
10
The economics of production and distribution
35
Politics and commerce
42
The organisation of labour
50
Methods of distribution
56
Plate III A Pair of Candleholders Journal fur Fabrik Manufaktur
57
The market as spectacle
66
Contested property
72
values and attitudes
89
Fine ceramics in social use
127
The transmission of styles 177 CONTENTS
177
Emblems
194
British Library
205
Conclusion
219
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Sarah Richards is Research Fellow in the History of Design at Manchester Metropolitan University.

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