The Transcendentalists: An Anthology

Front Cover
Perry Miller
Harvard University Press, Jan 1, 1950 - Literary Criticism - 521 pages
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User Review  - Henry - Goodreads

Transcendentalism is easily my favorite American literature movement. This anthology has some of my favorite pieces in it. Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
3
Philosophical
7
Forerunners
16
Edward Everett
26
James Marsh
34
Emergence
49
George Ripley
59
George Ripley
65
George Ripley
258
Jesus Christ the Same Yesterday Today and Forever
284
George Ripley
294
Amos Bronson Alcott
303
Theodore Parker
315
Henry D Thoreau
324
Literary and Critical
331
Jones Very
341

Frederic Henry Hedge
72
James Walker
82
George Ripley
89
George Ripley
99
A Annus Mirabilis
106
William Henry Furness
124
Discourses on the Philosophy of Religion
132
Elizabeth Palmer Peabody
140
Amos Bronson Alcott
150
z Miracles
157
James Freeman Clarke
168
Francis Bowen
177
ij Orestes A Brownson
183
Ralph Waldo Emerson
192
James Freeman Clarke Christopher Pearse Cranch
200
Manifestoes
247
Margaret Fuller
366
Elizabeth Palmer Peabody
372
William Ellery Channing
381
The Garden
391
Margaret Fuller
402
John Sullivan Dwight
410
Political and Social
422
Orestes A Brownson
431
Bibliography
434
William Henry Channing
446
Margaret Fuller
457
Elizabeth Palmer Peabody
464
Frederic Henry Hedge
471
IO Recollections
484
Copyright

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About the author (1950)

Born and educated in Chicago, Perry Miller received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1931. From that year until his death, he taught at Harvard University. Working with such source materials as diaries and letters, he studed the literature and culture of New England in the colonial and early national eras. His books, and especially his most popular work, The New England Mind (1939--53), radically altered the old stereotypical view of Puritan life as dreary and uninvolved with worldly matters and did much to create renewed interest in the Puritanism of early New England. As Granville Hicks wrote, "He respected the Puritans as thinkers, and he regarded them more highly than he did their successors who moderated their teachings" (Saturday Review). A professor of American literature, Miller wrote critical essays and compiled anthologies of early American poetry and prose. One work, The Life of the Mind in America, published posthumously in 1965, won the 1966 Pulitzer Prize in history. All of Miller's works were informed by a keen sense of history and reminded students of American civilization of how much the Puritans and the Transcendentalists shaped the national culture.

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