A Heart So White

Front Cover
New Directions Publishing, 2000 - Fiction - 278 pages
15 Reviews
Javier Marías's A Heart So White chronicles with unnerving insistence the relentless power of the past. Juan knows little of the interior life of his father Ranz; but when Juan marries, he begins to consider the past anew, and begins to ponder what he doesn't really want to know. Secrecy—its possible convenience, its price, and even its civility—hovers throughout the novel. A Heart So White becomes a sort of anti-detective story of human nature. Intrigue; the sins of the father; the fraudulent and the genuine; marriage and strange repetitions of violence: Marías elegantly sends shafts of inquisitory light into shadows and on to the costs of ambivalence. ("My hands are of your colour; but I shame/To wear a heart so white"—Shakespeare's Macbeth.)
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
11
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
1

Review: A Heart So White

User Review  - Maria Pilar Gomez - Goodreads

Marias writes as following one's line of though very closely, reading one's mind while capturing and interpreting a situation, a daily common scenario. He is very good at turning into words thoughts ... Read full review

Review: A Heart So White

User Review  - Stephen P - Goodreads

A book about boundaries, both protected and invaded as well as about time. What is present already is diffused into the past and therefore cannot be known. One cannot know anything! At some point it ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
9
Section 3
24
Section 4
47
Section 5
68
Section 6
71
Section 7
90
Section 8
112
Section 10
145
Section 11
164
Section 12
184
Section 13
204
Section 14
221
Section 15
237
Section 16
271
Section 17
284

Section 9
132

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Javier Marias is an award-winning Spanish novelist. He is also a translator and columnist, as well as the current king of Redonda. He was born in Madrid in 1951 and published his first novel at the age of nineteen. He has held academic posts in Spain, the US (he was a visiting professor at Wellesley College) and Britain, as a lecturer in Spanish Literature at Oxford University. He has been translated into 34 languages, and more than six million copies of his books have been sold worldwide. In 1997 he won the Nelly Sachs Award; the Comunidad de Madrid award in 1998; in 2000 the Grinzane Cavour Award, the Alberto Moravia Prize, and the Dublin IMPAC Award. He also won the Spanish National Translation Award in 1979 for his translation of Tristram Shandy in 1979. He was a professor at Oxford University and the Complutense of Madrid. He currently lives in Madrid.

Margaret Jull Costa has translated into the English more than 35 books, including Nobel Laureate Jose Saramago's "All the Names" & "The Tale of the Unknown Island", Antonio Perez Reverte's "The Flander's Panel", Fernando Pessoa's Book of Disquiet" & Luisa Valenzuela's "Bedside Manners". She lives in London.

Bibliographic information