The History of Mount Mica of Maine, U.S.A. and Its Wonderful Deposits of Matchless Tourmalines (Google eBook)

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A.C. Hamlin, 1895 - Mica, Mount (Me.) - 72 pages
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Page 22 - ... brownish argillo-arenaceous shales. They are composed of interstratified layers of black and white arenaceous shales, very thin and loosely bedded. They are strongly calcareous, and in similar shales in other parts of the field, I have seen small lenticular masses of pure white limestone up to an eighth of an inch in thickness and three or four inches in length 93 4 14. Brown carbonaceous shale, the black bat of the miners 6 3 15. Light grey argillo-calcareous shale, containing a great deal of...
Page 11 - ... village, they proceeded to the hill and managed in a rough way to drill several holes in the ledge and blast them out. These operations, though of trivial magnitude, were attended with unlooked-for results, for the explosions threw out, to the astonishment of the boys, large quantities of bright-colored lepidolite, broad sheets of mica, and masses of quartz crystals of a variety of hues. The last blast exposed a decayed place in the ledge, which yielded readily to the thrusts of a sharpened stick...
Page 12 - ... substance resembling sand, loosely packed. Amongst this sand or disintegrated rock, crystals of tourmaline of extraordinary size and beauty were found scattered here and there in the soft matrix. Scratching away with renewed energy, the boys soon emptied the pocket of its contents, and found that they had obtained more than twenty splendid crystals of various forms and hues. One of these was a magnificent tourmaline of a rich green color and a remarkable transparency. It was more than two inches...
Page 8 - ... horizon. At this moment the view of the intervening country, diversified in color and in shade, together with the gorgeous masses of changing clouds in the western sky, formed a picture of great beauty, and young Hamlin, fascinated with the entrancing picture spread before him, halted for a moment on the crest of a little knoll to enjoy the scene. On turning to the eastward for an instant for a final look at the woods and mountains in his rear, a vivid gleam of green flashed from an object on...
Page 10 - ... as soil. Parts of the ledge yet exposed to view were fairly honeycombed with small cavities and soft spots, where the decomposing feldspar was crumbling away. In these cavities and decayed places in the rock, other tourmalines were obtained by breaking away the edges of the cavities, or removing the decomposed material.
Page 26 - Surface marked by rather strong concentric lines of growth, and a few striae on partially exfoliated specimens. * This species varies from the last in being five or six times as large, measuring nearly three-fourths of an inch in length by a little more than half an inch in width'.
Page 10 - Collecting as many of the choice and beautiful specimens as they could carry, the students, heavily laden, returned to the village, and sought to ascertain the nature of their mineral treasures. Subsequent examination indicated that the ledge was perforated with cavities, in which the tourmalines and other minerals had been deposited. It was also evident that the crystals that had been gathered by the students had been set free from their cavities by the decomposition of indefinite periods of time,...
Page 12 - The last blast exposed a decayed place in the ledge, which yielded readily to the thrusts of a sharpened stick or the point of the iron drills. As the surface was removed, great numbers of minute tourmalines were discovered in the decomposed feldspar and lepidolite. The rock became softer and softer as the boys proceeded in their work of excavation, and soon they reached a large cavity of two or more bushels capacity.
Page 12 - ... more than twenty splendid crystals of various forms and hues. One of these was a magnificent tourmaline of a rich green color and a remarkable transparency. It was more than two inches and a half in length by nearly two inches in diameter, and both of its terminations were finely formed and perfect. Several others possessed extraordinary beauty, and some of them were quite three inches in length and an inch in diameter. The colors of these tourmalines were quite varied, but were chiefly red and...
Page 12 - This hollow place, or rotten place, appeared to be filled with ?. substance resembling sand, loosely packed. Amongst this sand or disintegrated rock, crystals of tourmaline of extraordinary size and beauty were found scattered here and there in the soft matrix. Scratching away with renewed energy, the boys soon emptied the pocket of its contents, and found that they had obtained more than twenty splendid crystals of various forms and hues.

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