Selling the Race: Culture, Community, and Black Chicago, 1940-1955

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University of Chicago Press, 2007 - History - 306 pages
4 Reviews

In Selling the Race, Adam Green tells the story of how black Chicagoans were at the center of a national movement in the 1940s and í50s, a time when African Americans across the country first started to see themselves as part of a single culture. Along the way, he offers fascinating reinterpretations of such events as the 1940 American Negro Exposition, the rise of black music and the culture industry that emerged around it, the development of the Associated Negro Press and the founding of Johnson Publishing, and the outcry over the 1955 lynching of Emmett Till.

By presenting African Americans as agents, rather than casualties, of modernity, Green ultimately reenvisions urban existence in a way that will resonate with anyone interested in race, culture, or the life of cities.

  

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Review: Selling the Race: Culture, Community, and Black Chicago, 1940-1955

User Review  - Timothy Tyson - Goodreads

The chapter on the lynching of Emmett Till and Chicago's crucial relationship to that tragedy is brilliant, sensitive, eloquent and profound. It adds an entirely new dimension to what once seemed to ... Read full review

Review: Selling the Race: Culture, Community, and Black Chicago, 1940-1955

User Review  - Joshua - Goodreads

Pretty good. Also, the layout is amazing. Nice work U of C press. Read full review

Contents

AN INTRODUCTION
1
IMAGINING THE FUTURE
19
MAKING THE MUSIC
51
THE ENDS OF CLIENTAGE
93
SELLING THE RACE
129
A MOMENT OF SIMULTANEITY
179
AN AFRICANAMERICAN DILEMMA
213
Notes
219
Index
269
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 264 - Elaine Scarry, The Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the World (New York: Oxford University Press, 1985), 60-157, esp.

About the author (2007)

Adam Green is associate professor of history at the University of Chicago.

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