The Modern Traveller: A Description, Geographical, Historical, and Topographical, of the Various Countries of the Globe, Volume 9 (Google eBook)

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Wells & Lilly, 1831 - Voyages and travels
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Page 185 - And it came to pass, when Pharaoh had let the people go, that God led them not through the way of the land of the Philistines, although that was near; for God said, Lest peradventure the people repent when they see war, and they return to Egypt...
Page 259 - It was a sight indeed, able to pierce one's heart, to behold so many thousands in their garments of humility and mortification, with their naked heads, and cheeks watered with tears ; and to hear their grievous sighs and sobs, begging earnestly for the remission of their sins...
Page 61 - This was the first flight ; but afterwards several others followed them, retiring, one after another, to the number of eighty-three men, and eighteen women, besides children. These refugees were kindly received by the Najashi, or king of Ethiopia, who refused to deliver them up to those whom the Koreish sent to demand them, and, as the Arab writers unanimously attest, even professed the Mahometan religion.
Page 26 - This building stood like a mountain above the city, and was by them esteemed so strong, that they were in no apprehension of its ever failing. The water rose to the height of almost twenty fathoms, and was kept in on every side by a work so solid, that many of the inhabitants had their houses built upon it.
Page 81 - The harmony and copiousness of style will not reach, in a version, the European infidel : he will peruse with impatience the endless incoherent rhapsody of fable, and precept, and declamation ; which seldom excites a sentiment or an idea, which sometimes crawls in the dust, 197 and is sometimes lost in the clouds.
Page 338 - ... most extraordinary hues, whose summits present us with nature in her most savage and romantic form, whilst their bases are worked out in all the symmetry and regularity of art with colonnades and pediments, and ranges of corridors adhering to the perpendicular surface.
Page 258 - LI. nations, and of all colours, coming from the extremities of the earth, through a thousand dangers, and encountering fatigues of every description, to adore together the same God, the God of nature. The native of Circassia presents his hand in a friendly manner to the Ethiopian, or the Negro of Guinea ; the Indian and the Persian embrace the inhabitant of Barbary and Morocco ; all looking upon each other as brothers, or individuals of the same family umted by the bands of religion ; and the greater...
Page 44 - These were by them called goddesses, and the daughters of God ; an appellation they gave not only to the angels, but also to their images, which they either believed to be inspired with life by God, or else to become the tabernacles of the angels, and to be animated by them ; and they gave them divine worship, because they imagined they interceded for them with God.
Page 339 - Towards the further end of this dark vault lie the two corresponding leaves of an iron grating, which formerly prevented all nearer approach to the tomb of the prophet ; they have, however, been thrown down, and we advanced so as to touch it ; it was covered by a ragged pall. We were obliged to descend barefooted ; and were not without some apprehension of treading on scorpions or other reptiles in such a place.

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