Parish Boundaries: The Catholic Encounter with Race in the Twentieth-Century Urban North

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University of Chicago Press, May 15, 1996 - History - 362 pages
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Parish Boundaries chronicles the history of Catholic parishes in major cities such as Boston, Chicago, Detroit, New York, and Philadelphia, melding their unique place in the urban landscape to the course of twentieth century American race relations. In vivid portraits of parish life, John McGreevy examines the contacts and conflicts between Euro-American Catholics and their African-American neighbors. By tracing the transformation of a church, its people, and the nation, McGreevy illuminates the enormous impact of religious culture on modern American society.

"Parish Boundaries can take its place in the front ranks of the literature of urban race relations."—Jonathan Dorfman, Washington Post Book Review

"A prodigiously researched, gracefully written book distinguished especially by its seamless treatment of social and intellectual history."—Robert Orsi, American Historical Review

"Parish Boundaries will fascinate historians and anyone interested in the historic connection between parish and race."—Ed Marciniak, Chicago Tribune

"The history that remains to be written will rest on the firm foundation of Mr. McGreevy's remarkable book."—Richard Wightman Fox, New York Times Book Review
  

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Contents

Introduction
3
THREE
56
FOU
80
FIVE
102
Community Organization and Urban Renewal
111
Washington and Rome
133
Civil Rights and the Second Vatican Council
161
EIGHT
176
Catholic Freedom Struggle
209
CONCLUSION
250
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
266
NOTES
273
INDEX
352
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

John T. McGreevy is the John A. O'Brien Associate Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. He lives in South Bend, Indiana. His previous book, "Parish Boundaries", won the John Gilmary Shea Prize of the American Catholic Historical Association.

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