History of Spanish Literature, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1891 - Spanish literature
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Page 177 - ... and its cheerful trust in goodness and virtue — it was written in his old age, at the conclusion of a life nearly every step of which had been marked with disappointed expectations, disheartening struggles and sore calamities ; that he began it in a prison, and that it was finished when he felt the hand of death pressing heavy and cold upon his heart. If this be remembered as we read, we may feel, as we ought to feel, what admiration and reverence are due, not only to the living power of Don...
Page 481 - It leads him to repeat from himself till many of his personages become standing characters, and his heroes and their servants, his ladies and their confidants, his old men and his buffoons, seem to be produced, like the masked figures of the ancient theatre, to represent, with the same attributes and in the same costume, the different intrigues of his various plots. It leads him, in short, to regard the whole of the Spanish drama as a form, within whose limits his imagination may be indulged without...
Page 103 - How shall those eyes now find repose That turn, in vain, thy smile to see ? What can they hear save mortal woes, Who lose thy voice's melody ? " And who shall lay his tranquil hand Upon the troubled ocean's might ? Who hush the winds by his command ? Who guide us through this starless night?
Page 319 - He was not absolutely an improvisator, for his education and position naturally led him to devote himself to written composition, but he was continually on the borders of whatever belongs to an improvisator's peculiar province ; was continually showing, in his merits and defects, in his ease, grace, and sudden resource, in his wildness and extravagance, in the happiness of his versification and the prodigal abundance of his imagery, that a very little more freedom, a very little more indulgence given...
Page 481 - ... into the gayer divisions of his drama, and the moving tenderness that pervades its graver and more tragical portions, lift us unconsciously to the height where alone his brilliant exhibitions can prevail with our imaginations, —where alone we can be interested and deluded, when we find ourselves in the midst, not only of such a confusion of the different forms of the drama, but of such a confusion of the proper limits of dramatic and lyrical poetry. To this elevated tone, and to the constant...
Page 172 - ... of Don Quixote, and used merely to bring out his master's peculiarities in a more striking relief. It is not until we have gone through nearly half of the First Part that he utters one of those proverbs which form afterwards the staple of his conversation and humor ; and it is not until...
Page 63 - In his latter days he tells us that— ' The whole stock of a manager was contained in a large sack, and consisted of four white shepherd's jackets, turned up with leather, gilt or stamped; four beards and false sets of hanging locks, and four shepherd's crooks, more or less. The plays were colloquies like eclogues between two or three shepherds and a shepherdess...
Page 483 - LOVE THE GREATEST ENCHANTMENT: THE SORCERIES OF SIN: THE DEVOTION OF THE CROSS.
Page 164 - ... anything rather than a scornful or broken spirit, or a want of faith in what is most to be valued in our common nature. The great wonder is, that Cervantes succeeded. But that he did there is no question. No book of chivalry was written after the appearance of Don Quixote...
Page 206 - O, hush, then, and keep Your branches all still, — My babe is asleep! Cold blasts wheel about him, — A rigorous storm, — And ye see how, in vain, I would shelter his form; — Holy angels and blest, As above me ye sweep, Hold these branches at rest, — My babe is asleep!

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