The Bishop Hill Colony: A Religious Communistic Settlement in Henry County, Illinois, Issues 1-12 (Google eBook)

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Johns Hopkins Press, 1892 - Bishop Hill (Ill.) - 80 pages
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Page 73 - Society; and by that name they and their successors shall and may have perpetual succession; shall be capable of suing and being sued, pleading and being impleaded, in all suits of...
Page 25 - COLONY. lowers from Sweden, and the founding in America of a socialistic theocratic community, for he had by this time abandoned all hopes of obtaining in Sweden religious liberty, either for himself or for his followers. Impelled from one point to another by the spirit of opposition, he had now developed an independent system of theology, directly antagonistic to the authority of the Established Church. Without incurring the displeasure of the Church, he had begun his reformatory activity by opposing...
Page 49 - But as the real and other property of the society increased, the disadvantages of not having a legal organization became apparent. It was necessary to hold property in the names of individual members, but in case of bad faith on the part of the natural heirs, complications concerning the succession might, upon the death of such members, arise in the probate courts. Hence, for the better conservation of its proprietary interests, the society decided to apply to the State Legislature for a charter....
Page 27 - Jansonists included in their number a large proportion of miners and factor}7 hands, and poor people of every description, for Jansonism was, in the true sense of the word, a popular religious movement. Many of the Jansonists were therefore persons who were unable to defray the expenses of a long journey. It was this fact which prompted Eric Janson to make community of goods a part of the social economy of the New Jerusalem. He based his reasons for the adoption of communism entirely on scriptural...
Page 76 - ... majority of the male adult members of the Colony shall require such meeting, by signifying their request to the trustees in writing five days previous to such meeting. ARTICLE 6. Our property and industry and the proceeds thereof shall constitute a common fund, from, by and with which it shall be the duty of the Board of Trustees to provide for the subsistence, comfort and reasonable wants of every member of the Colony, for the support of the aged and infirm, for the care and cure of the sick...
Page 14 - The first mining of coal in a commercial way in the United States was in what is known as the Richmond Basin, a small area in the eastern part of Virginia. Small quantities of coal had been mined here in the latter part of the eighteenth century and it was also in the latter part of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth centuries that efforts were being made to introduce anthracite coal for fuel purposes.
Page 25 - The glory of the work which is to be accomplished by Eric Janson, standing in Christ's stead, shall far exceed that of the work accomplished by Jesus and his Apostles," quoted in translation by Mikkelsen from Cateches, af Eric Janson (Soderhamn, 1846), 80. not enough to shock the pious Lutherans and everywhere stir up the zeal of the Lutheran clergy, a second burning of books followed in October, in which the Bible alone was spared.21 Janson was repeatedly...
Page 74 - ... proper so to do, for the benefit of the Colony. SECTION 7. All the real estate heretofore conveyed by any person or persons to the Trustees of the Bishop Hill Society, shall be, and the titles to said lands are hereby invested in the said Trustees above appointed, for the uses and purposes above specified. SECTION 8. The said Bishop Hill Colony may pass such by-laws concerning the government and management of the property and business of said Colony, and the admission, withdrawal and expulsion...
Page 53 - The main farm was at Bishop Hill, but besides there were eight sub-farms, where gangs of workmen relieved each other at fixed intervals. A great deal of the unskilled labor was performed by women, for they constituted about two-thirds of the community, and the men were greatly needed in the trades. Unmarried women worked in the brick-kilns and assisted in the building operations, pitching the bricks, two at a time, from one story to another, instead of carrying them in hods. The milking was done...
Page 8 - Hence, much of the information contained in this volume has needs been gathered from the lips of surviving members of the Bishop Hill Colony. In many instances the reports were of a conflicting nature, for the Jansonists are now split up into several religious parties, and each has its separate views to uphold. But care has been taken not to accept any statement unless supported by proper collateral evidence. Another serious obstacle encountered was the unwillingness of the Jansonists to reveal any...

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