American common-school arithmetic ... (Google eBook)

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Tappan, Whittemore & Mason, 1849 - Mathematics
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Page 214 - The circumference of every circle is supposed to be divided into 360 equal parts, called degrees ; each degree into 60 equal parts, called minutes ; and each minute into 60 equal parts, called seconds.
Page 73 - Thirty days hath September, April, June, and November ; All the rest have thirty-one. Except the second month alone, Which has but twenty-eight, in fine, Till leap year gives it twenty-nine.
Page 9 - Los n˙meros cardinales 0: zero 1: one 2: two 3: three 4: four 5: five 6: six 7: seven 8: eight 9: nine 10: ten 11: eleven 12: twelve 13: thirteen 14: fourteen 15: fifteen 16: sixteen 17: seventeen 18: eighteen 19: nineteen 20: twenty...
Page 91 - If the numerator and denominator of each fraction is multiplied (or divided) by the same number, the value of the fraction will not change.
Page 87 - The least common multiple of two or more numbers, is the least number that can be divided by each of them without a remainder.
Page 93 - To reduce a mixed number to an improper fraction, Ś RULE : Multiply the whole number by the denominator of the fraction, to the product add the numerator, and write the result over the denominator.
Page 199 - RULE. 1 . Separate the given number into periods of three figures each, by putting a point over the unit figure and every third figure bejond the place of units.
Page 45 - ... as many decimal places in the quotient as there are units in the remainder thus found.
Page 203 - I. The first term, common difference, and number of terms being given to find the last term, and sum of all the terms. RULE 1. Ś Multiply the number of terms, less one, by the common difference, and to that product, add the first term, the sum is the last term.
Page 196 - Multiply the divisor, thus increased, by the last figure of the root; subtract the product from the dividend, and to the remainder bring down the next period for a new dividend. 5. Double the whole root already found for a new divisor, and continue the operation as before, until all the periods are brought down. NOTE.

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