Facts and Suggestions Relative to Finance & Currency Addressed to the President of the Confederate States (Google eBook)

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J. T. Paterson & Company, 1864 - Money - 80 pages
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Page 71 - Adam he said, because thou hast hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hast eaten of the tree of which I commanded thee saying thou shalt not eat of it ; cursed is the ground for thy sake, in sorrow shalt thou eat of it, all the days of thy life. Thorns and thistles shall it bring forth to thee, and thou shalt eat the herb of the field. In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground, for out of it wast thou taken, for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.
Page 71 - And unto Adam he said, Because thou hast hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hast eaten of the tree, of which I commanded thee, saying, Thou shalt not eat of it: cursed is the ground for thy sake; in sorrow shalt thou eat of it all the days of thy life; thorns also and thistles shall it bring forth to thee; and thou shalt eat the herb of the field.
Page 71 - And he said, Blessed be the LORD God of Shem; and Canaan shall be his servant. God shall enlarge Japheth, and he shall dwell in the tents of Shem; and Canaan shall be his servant.
Page 10 - ... to keep safely, without loaning, using, depositing in banks, or exchanging for other funds than as allowed by...
Page 10 - I conclude that it is because the one is at his command, and the other not. We are told the form I suggested is but a repetition of the old Continental money a ghost that is ever conjured up by all who wish to give the banks an exclusive monopoly of government credit. The assertion is not true : there is not the least analogy between them. The one was a promise to pay when there was no revenue, and the other a promise to receive in the dues of government when there is an abundant revenue.
Page 15 - To lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts, and excises, for revenue necessary to pay the debts, provide for the common defence, and carry on the government of the Confederate States; but no bounties shall be granted from the treasury; nor shall any duties or taxes on importations from foreign nations be laid to promote or foster any branch of industry; and all duties, imposts, and excises shall be uniform throughout the Confederate States: 2.
Page 8 - A paper money, consisting in bank notes, issued by people of undoubted credit, payable upon demand, without any condition, and, in fact, always readily paid as soon as presented, is, in every respect, equal in value to gold and silver money, since gold and silver money can at anytime be had for it.
Page 32 - ' 3. The prices of the products of our industry having thus fallen within the range of the fixed charges and expenses which the law compels us to discharge, the just and necessary profits of our respective trades have ceased to exist, and in many cases a positive loss attends them. " ' 4. Under these circumstances, we have long hesitated in determining what line of conduct our interest and our duties require us to adopt.
Page 71 - And he said, BLESSED be the Lord God of Shem ; And Canaan shall be his servant. God shall enlarge Japheth, And he shall dwell in the tents of Shem ; And Canaan shall be his servant.
Page 54 - ... loan or advance of money to the Emperor, or to any other foreign. state, should, in the present state of affairs, take place, it will, in all probability, prove fatal to the Bank of England. The court of directors do therefore most earnestly deprecate the adoption of any such measure ; and they solemnly protest against any responsibility for the calamitous consequences that may follow thereupon.

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