The Cambridge Ancient History, Volume 6

Front Cover
D. M. Lewis, John Boardman
Cambridge University Press, 1994 - History - 1077 pages
4 Reviews
Volume VI of the new edition of The Cambridge Ancient History begins with Sparta attempting to consolidate its leadership of mainland Greece and ends with the death of Alexander the Great after he had conquered the Persian Empire and marched far into India. It is correspondingly wide-ranging in its treatment of the politics and economy, not only of old Greece, but of the Near East and the western Mediterranean. The century also saw the continued development of Classical Greek art and the moulding of Greek prose as an uniquely flexible means of expression. The formation of the great philosophical schools assured to Athens in her political decline a long future as a cultural centre, and established patterns of thought which dominated western civilization for two thousand years.
  

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The best in the series—Athens—the birthplace of western civilisation. The growth of Athens, its leadership of Greece, and then the treacherous attack by the Spartans, financed by Persia! Read full review

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6

Contents

Attica and the Peloponnese
16
Sparta as victor
24
Persia
45
Tetradrachm of Cy2icus Pharnaba2us page
60
The Corinthian War
97
Sicily 415568 B C
120
The Kings Peace and the Second Athenian Confederacy
156
Thebes in the 5605 B C
187
Modes of sailing
515
Society and economy
527
n Population and military manpower 555
535
1n The finances of Greek states
541
The polis and the alternatives
565
the anatomy of politics
573
1n Alternatives to the polis
579
Greek culture and science
591

Persian lands and neighbours
209
The Pyramid Tomb at Sardis 118
218
b Mesopotamia 481550 B C 254
234
Mesopotamia
256
8r Judah 161
261
Cyprus 198
271
8 Cyprus and Phoenicia 197
297
Plan of the Palace at Vouni 501
301
Judah and Phoenicia 518
318
Be Egypt 404552 B C 557
337
Egypt 558
358
the West and North 561
361
Italy 582
365
Plan of the northeast gate at Nea Paphos 505
372
Bron2e corslet dedicated by Novius Fannius 585
383
9f Celtic Europe
404
The Celtic world
405
Reeonstruction of the burial at Hochdorf
408
Gilt iron and bron2e helmet from Agris Charente
416
td Illyrians and Northwest Greeks
422
Ornament from gold torque from VCaldalgesheim 410
425
n The northwest Greeks c 540560 B C 450
430
The Temple of Zeus at Dodona about 4400 B C 452
435
1n Illyrians and northwest Greeks c 560525 B C 456
437
9 Thracians and Scythians
444
Tholos tomb at MaI Tepe
448
Gilt silver rhyton from Borovo
461
9y The Bosporan Kingdom
476
Plan of the Cimmerian Straits and dirches
487
1n The fifth century
488
Coins of the smaller states of the Bosporus
494
v1 Suecessful synoecism on the Cimmerian Bosporus
506
Grave stela from Taman
507
9 Mediterranean communications
512
2b Medicine
614
Classical to Hellenistic
647
2d Greek agriculture in the classical period
661
1n The agricultural landscape
670
12e Warfare
678
Sally ports in the Dema wall
679
Lead cavalry registration tablet
682
Dion and Timoleon
693
Macedonia and Chalcidice
714
Macedon and northwest Greece
723
Central Greeee
780
The events of the reign
791
The conquest of the Aegean coast 554555 B C
797
1n From Cilicia to Egypt 555 and 552 B C
805
The Kabul valley
826
Fiveshekel coins struck by Alexander in Babylon
831
vn The last years 525525 B C 854
834
Greece and the conquered
846
The Punjab
850
Las Bela and the Makran
856
hy SIMoN HORNBLOWER
876
Chronological table 8 8 2
882
BIBLIOGRAPHY
902
A General
908
The Greek states 939
919
Macedon 954
934
E The North
944
F The East
963
G The West
994
H Greek culture and science
1006
Social and economic history
1016
J Art and architecture
1022
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About the author (1994)

About the Editor:
John Boardman is Lincoln Professor of Classical Archaelogy and Art at Oxford University, and editor of the acclaimed Oxford History of The Classical World, which The New York Times Book Review called "the finest one-volume survey available."

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