Hunting with the Eskimos: the unique record of a sportsman's year among the northernmost tribe--the big game hunting, the native life, and the battle for existence through the long Arctic night (Google eBook)

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The Century co., 1910 - Hunting - 453 pages
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Page 269 - ... spoke no English. He was as greatly astonished to meet a white man here as I was to meet him. The three men were sights to behold. Human beings could not be more unkempt. They were half starved and very thin, terribly dirty, and Dr. Cook, like the Eskimos, had long hair reaching to his shoulders. For many months they had been without dogs and had hauled a sledge a long distance from the southward. Open water had prevented their taking a direct course across Smith Sound from Cape Sabine, and they...
Page 83 - Far away on the driving ice of the Sound a lone figure was running and raving. The boatswain and Billy joined me, and as fast as we could struggle through three feet of snow, with drifts often to the waist, we gave pursuit. At length I reached her, and to my astonishment...
Page 67 - Tukshu began suddenly to rave upon leaving the boat. He tore off every stitch of clothing he had on, and would have thrown himself into the water of the Sound, but for the restraint of the Eskimos. He seemed possessed of supernatural strength, and it was all four men could do to hold him.
Page 83 - ... [wife] came in and the two women began to cry and moan . . . (Give me my man! Give me my man! ) . At half-past one that [same] night I was awakened ... by a woman shouting at the top of her voice shrill and startling, like one gone mad. I knew at once what it meant someone had gone problocto. Far away on the driving ice of the Sound a lone figure was running and raving. The boatswain and Billy joined me, and as fast as we could struggle through three feet of snow, with drifts often to...
Page 129 - ... be said for the Eskimos that they are possessed of a full sense of their responsibility in this matter. The Eskimo has deep affection for his family. He will do and sacrifice more for his children than any people I have ever known, without exception. This kindness extends not alone to his own flesh and blood, but to orphans and other dependents, who are unable to care for themselves. It is so rare for an Eskimo to inflict physical punishment upon a child, that I may say he never resorts to that...
Page 87 - Kulutinguah's assistance, but the woman was strong as a lion, and we had all we could do to hold her. A strong north wind was blowing, with a temperature eight degrees below zero, and I thought she would surely be severely frozen before we could get her into the igloo again, but in some miraculous manner she escaped even the slightest frost-bite. After getting her...
Page 201 - ... on the ice as we sped forward, in an endeavor to retard the sledge and prevent it running the dogs down, which constantly seemed unavoidable and imminent. Teddylinguah and I reached the frozen ocean at the foot of the incline considerably in advance of the others, and here halted to rest the dogs, which were panting and heated with the hard run, and to straighten and unravel tangled traces. This gave me opportunity to watch the others descend. It was a wonderful exhibition of skill on the part...
Page 331 - ... these conditions and avoid attacks of rheumatism or pneumonia I cannot understand. Certainly people in a civilized country cannot long escape illness who live in surroundings much less unsanitary. An amusing incident occurred at this time indicative of the resourcefulness of the Eskimos. Ilabrado's kooner was visiting at one of the other tupeks, when her children set up a cry which took her back to her own tupek on a run. Presently I learned the cause of the commotion. Upon my arrival at Etah...
Page 87 - ... clothing off and threw herself into a snow-drift. I ran to [her husband's] assistance, but the woman was as strong as a lion, and we had all we could do to hold her. A strong north wind was blowing, with a temperature eight degrees below zero, and I thought she would surely be severely frozen . . . but in some miraculous manner she escaped even the slightest frost-bite. After getting her into the igloo she grew weak as a kitten, and it was several hours before she became quite herself. In connection...
Page 153 - ... Later in the day I tried my hand at making a cake, but it was a flat failure, so soggy and heavy that I was afraid to eat much of it. This, too, went to the Eskimos, and they appeared to enjoy it exceedingly. We were to have games, and I rigged up a small piece of ivory with a hole in the center, which was suspended at the end of a string at the middle of the shack.

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