Dramas, Tragic, Comic and Legendary, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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C. Dolman, 1853
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Page 403 - Not a hair-worth of white, which some will say Weakens his price, and many will not buy His goodness with this note ; which superstition Here finds allowance, — on this horse is Arcite Trotting the stones of Athens, which the calkins...
Page 216 - I remember Two miles on this side of the fort, the road Crosses a deep ravine ; 'tis rough and narrow, And winds with short turns down the precipice; And in its depth there is a mighty rock, Which has, from unimaginable years, Sustained itself with terror and with toil Over a gulf, and with the agony With which it clings seems slowly coming down...
Page 216 - Over a gulf, and with the agony With which it clings seems slowly coming down; Even as a wretched soul hour after hour, Clings to the mass of life; yet clinging, leans; And leaning, makes more dark the dread abyss In which it fears to fall: beneath this crag, Huge as despair, as if in weariness, The melancholy mountain yawns; below...
Page 398 - ... perfectly bright. Blessed man ! he had escaped from the wild labyrinths of doubt into the stronghold of belief ; from thence, with undisturbed tranquillity of soul, he beheld and portrayed the storms of the world : to him human life was no longer a dark riddle.
Page 403 - Came music's origin), what envious flint, Cold as old Saturn, and like him possess'd With fire malevolent, darted a spark, Or what fierce sulphur else, to this end made, I comment not ; the hot horse, hot as fire, Took toy at this, and fell to what disorder His power could give his will, bounds...
Page 179 - THOU art, O God ! the life and light Of all this wondrous world we see ; Its glow by day, its smile by night, Are but reflections caught from thee. Where'er we turn thy glories shine, And all things fair and bright are thine.
Page 234 - To Thee, O Lord, my spirit climbs, To Thee from every lonely hill I burn to sacrifice my will A thousand and a thousand times. And such my boundless love to Thee I wish each will of mine a living soul could be. Would that my love I could have shown, By leaving for Thy sake, instead Of that poor crown that press'd my head, Some proud, imperial crown and throne — Some empire which the sun surveys Through all its daily course and gilds with constant rays. * This lowly grot, 'neath rocks uphurled,...
Page 403 - Seem'd with strange art to hang: his victor's wreath Even then fell off his head ; and presently Backward the jade comes o'er, and his full poise Becomes the rider's load. Yet is he living; But such a vessel 'tis that floats but for The surge that next approaches : he much desires To have some speech with you. Lo, he appears.
Page 403 - With fire malevolent, darted a spark, Or what fierce sulphur else, to this end made, I comment not ; the hot horse, hot as fire, Took toy at this and fell to what disorder His power could give his will, bounds, comes on end, Forgets school-doing, being therein...
Page 403 - I comment not ; the hot horse, hot as fire, Took toy' at this, and fell to what disorder His power could give his will ; bounds ; comes on end ; Forgets school-doing, being therein train'd, And of kind manage ; pig-like he whines At the sharp rowel, which he frets at rather Than any jot obeys ; seeks all foul means Of boisterous and rough jadery, to dis-seat His lord that kept it bravely.

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