Earth Sculpture: Or, The Origin of Land-forms (Google eBook)

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G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1898 - Erosion - 397 pages
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Page 401 - The results of modern science are of use in nearly every profession and calling, and are an essential part of modern education and culture. A series of scientific books, such as has been planned, should be assured of a wide circulation, and should contribute greatly to the advance and diffusion of scientific knowledge. The volumes will be in octavo form, and will be fully illustrated in so far as the subject-matter calls for illustrations. GP PUTNAM'S SONS, NEW YORK & LONDON (Volumes ready, in press,...
Page 402 - The Reproduction of Living Beings. By Professor MARCUS HARTOG, Queen's College, Cork. Man and the Higher Apes. By Dr. A. KEITH, FRCS Heredity. By J. ARTHUR THOMPSON, School of Medicine, Edinburgh. Life Areas of North America: A Study in the Distribution of Animals and Plants. By Dr. C. HART MERRIAM, Chief of the Biological Survey, US Department of Agriculture. Age, Growth, Sex, and Death. By Professor CHARLES S. MINOT, Harvard Medical School.
Page 368 - THERE rolls the deep where grew the tree. O earth, what changes hast thou seen ! There where the long street roars, hath been The stillness of the central sea. The hills are shadows, and they flow From form to form, and nothing stands; They melt like mist, the solid lands, Like clouds they shape themselves and go.
Page 402 - King's College, London. Illustrated. 8. The Stars. By Professor SIMON NEWCOMB, USN, Nautical Almanac Office, and Johns Hopkins University. Meteors and Comets. By Professor CA YOUNG, Princeton University. The Measurement of the Earth. By Professor TC MENDENHALL, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, formerly Superintendent of the US Coast and Geodetic Survey. Earthquakes. By Major CE BUTTON, USA Physiography ; The Forms of the Land.
Page 401 - Columbia University, with the cooperation of FRANK EVERS BEDDARD, FRS, in Great Britain. Each volume of the series will treat some department of science with reference to the most recent advances, and will be contributed by an author of acknowledged authority. Every effort will be made to maintain the standard set by the first volumes, until the series shall represent the more important aspects of contemporary science. The advance of science has been so rapid, and its place in modern life has become...
Page 333 - ... position, undisturbed by crustal oscillation, for a prolonged period of time, they will eventually be cut back by the sea. In this way a shelf or terrace will be formed, narrow in some places, broader in others, according to the resistance offered by the varying character of the rocks. But no long inlets or fiords can result from such action. At most the harder and less readily demolished rocks will form headlands, while shallow bays will be scooped out of the more yielding masses. In short,...
Page 148 - ... Highlands, when viewed from a commanding position, looks like a tumbled ocean in which the waves appear to be moving in all directions. One is also impressed with the fact that the undulations of the surface, however interrupted they may be, are broad the mountains, however they may vary in detail according to the character of the rocks, are massive, and generally roundshouldered and often somewhat flat-topped, while there is no great disparity of height amongst the dominant points of any...
Page 310 - The following quotation comes after a description of the rock walls of the fiords: Numerous tributary waters, some of which are hardly less important than the head-stream, do indeed pour into the fiord, but they have not yet eroded for themselves deep trenches. After winding through the plateauland in broad and shallow valleys their relatively gentle course is suddenly interrupted^ and they at once cascade down the precipitous rock-walls to the sea. The side-valleys that open upon a fiord are thus...
Page 333 - To sum up, then, we may say that the chief agents concerned in the development of coast-lines are crustal movements, sedimentation, and marine erosion. All the main trends are the result of elevation and depression. Considerable geographical changes, however, have been brought about by the silting up of those shallow and sheltered seas which, in certain regions, overflow wide areas of the continental plateau. Throughout all the ages, indeed, epigene agents have striven to reduce the superficial inequalities...

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