The New Orleans Medical and Surgical Journal, Volume 64 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Louisiana State Medical Society, 1912 - Medicine
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Contents

Amebiasis The Surgical Treatment ofBy William Seaman M D
105
Proper Feeding of Infants A Plea for theBy C H Rice M D 370
111
Gregory Joseph W M D Infantile Diarrhea Fermental Diarrhea
126
Tympanotomy Its Indications and Its TechniqueBy Homer
133
C M D
148
Double Hydrocele of Unusually Large SizeOperation 243
152
Vaccin Therapy in Tuberculosis
157
6 M D
170
Mercks Manual of the Materia Medica
174
Animal Parasites in the UrineReport of Three CasesBy William
185
Cole H P M D
189
Win M D Large SubMucous and FibroMyoma Com
197
Chassaignac Charles M D Cleaner and More Healthful New Orleans 340
220
Annual Address of Retiring PresidentBy B A Ledbetter M D 683
222
Public Is Interested TheEditorial
240
State Society Meeting TheEditorial 949
246
Cook Abner H M D
246
Microscopy Bacteriology and Human ParasitologyArchinard 877
257
Matas Rudolph M D The GallBladder and Biliary Tract an Avail
259
Recent Advances in Local AnesthesiaBy Carroll W Allen M D
283
Cole G Grenes M D Obstinate Puritus Cured by Excision of
291
Deeks W E M A M D
297
Cole H P M D Salvarsan and Syphilis 189
310
Medical Department of the University of TennesseeEditorial
318
Statistical NosologyEditorial
319
Congenital Absence of Left Half of Transverse Colon Descending
325
Medical News Items
329
Outline of the Care of the Obstetrical Patient in the Allgemeine
331
Dowling Oscar M D
335
AntiTyphoid Vaccination 159
345
Elliott Jr John B M DArteriosclerosis 496
351
Elliott Jr J B M D
352
King Howard D M D The Etiology and Epidemiological Irregu
357
Painless HematuriaBy Ferdinand C Walsh M D
368
Epithelioma of the LipBy J C Willis M D 777
384
One Thousand Surgical SuggestionsBrincknek
405
Gessner H B M D
407
Knighton J E M D The Relation of Gall Bladder to Disturbances
428
AntiTyphoid VaccinationBy C C Bass M D
440
Harrington E R M D NonSpecific Congestive Endometritis 846
455
Bass Charles C M D A New Conception of Immunity
462
Practical Medicine SeriesYearBook Publishers 172 406
471
L M D Syphilis of the Liver 278
473
Kohlmann WilliamRemarks on Prolapse of Uterus 416
475
History of Medicine in AmericaBy E J Graner M D 56
477
Regional Anesthesia of the Superior Maxillary Nerve
479
Stomach Dilation 623
480
Practitioners Visiting List for 1012Lea Febiger
488
Hypospadias The Treatment ofBy F W Parham M D
491
Cook Abner H M D The Diagnostic Value of the Reaction Follow
502
Pathogenesis of Hemorrhages of the NcwBorn 613
588
Krauss William M D Report of Three Cases of Animal Parasites
590
Pathology of Pregnancy and Labor Some Notes on theBy D
594
L
604
Fibrolysin The Action of
608
Meeting of the Southern Section of the American Laryngological
611
Relation of the Appendix to the Causation and Surgical Treatment
612
Perforation of the Colon Due to Amebic Ulcer 162
629
Influence of the Cold Bath Upon the Glycogen of Human Beings The
630
Graner E J M D
631
Bacteriology A TextBook ofHissZinsser 102
636
Rush Section Diagnosis as an Aid to the SurgeonBy William
637
BiParish Medical Society Proceedings 845
646
Its Technic Results and Indications 859
655
Injuries to the Parturient Canal During LaborBy C
663
Salivary Glands 392
665
JUNE 1912
671
Crain A P M D Nutrition in Infancy
676
Points on Epidemic CerebroSpinal MeningitisBy E M
680
Mental WasteBy J M Gwinn
688
Visiting Staff and the New Orleans Charity Hospital TheEditorial
704
Mistakes in Medical EducationEditorial 470
706
Gastric Ulcer
710
Nelken A M D Senile Hypertrophy of Prostate 925
713
GenitoUrinary Diseases A TextBook ofCasperBonney 174
722
Nerve Recurrences as a Result of Salvarsan Therapy 557
725
B M D Report of a Case of Successful Ligation
765
Cryptorchidism Operated on by the Bevan Method Two Cases ofBy
782
Cultivation of Plasmodia Malaria? Outside of the Human Body The
791
Louisiana State Board of Medical Examiners Honored TheEditorial
792
Wm M D
795
HandBook of Practical TreatmentMusserKelly
805
Serum Diagnosis of Syphilis and the Butyric Acid Test for Syphilis
806
Severed Tendons and Nerves of the Forearm 323
812
Ipecac and Other Drugs in Dysentery The Action of 617
845
TextBook of EmbryologyBaileyMiller 806
851
Nervous Indigestion The Problem ofBy George M Niles M D 335
856
Practitioners Notes 547 615
860
Glucose Injections
864
Diagnosis of Abnormal Stomach EvacuationBy F E Lamothe M D 431
865
Infections of the HandKanavel
876
TextBook of OphthalmologyFuchsDuane
877
Weil Arthur I M D Acute Otitis in Measles Diphtheria
880
Observations on the Effect of Ipecac Phenol and Salicylic Acid
881
Tropical Medicine and Hygiene The New Orleans School ofBy
893
Presidents Address American Society of Tropical MedicineBy
904
Tropical Medicine at TulaneEkiitorial 320
905
D M D Jacksons Membrane
924
Louisiana State Medical Society Notes 163 246 631 717 793 951
951
TextBook of PhysiologyHowell 807
961

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Page 148 - ... this committee that it is essential that it should be made a reportable disease in all states in order that its presence may be detected and its spread guarded against. Of particular significance are the so-called abortive cases, where indefinite ailments occur in children in communities where frank paralysis also exists. These abortive cases of infantile paralysis are undoubtedly a source of infection, and their record and study is of much importance. In a community where cases of infantile...
Page 148 - Anterior poliomyelitis is, so far as known, a communicable disease, being communicated from one patient to another and also by means of a third person. It occurs in epidemics and tends to spread along the lines of greatest travel. There is reason to believe that it is prevented from spreading by quarantine, and with the very great prevalence of the disease in the summer of 1910 it is the opinion of this committee that it is essential that it should be made a reportable disease in all states in order...
Page 907 - There can be no doubt that the future of pathology and of therapeutics, and therefore that of practical medicine, depends upon the extent to which those who occupy themselves with these subjects are trained in the methods and impregnated with the fundamental truths of biology.
Page 518 - ... as an ignorant, conscienceless woman. The emotional bitterness displayed in the patient's account was an immediate index of the serious pathological significance of this episode. Her attempts at harmony caused no satisfaction ; so she declares that she ceased worrying. "I had tried to adjust it, but failed ; for she is a married woman older than and above me in the office. She is angered because I do not associate with her. But as she had spoken disparagingly of my mother, I taxed her, only to...
Page 149 - All cases of infantile paralysis should be strictly quarantined, sputum, urine and feces being disinfected, and the same rigid precautions being adopted as in scarlet fever. This quarantine should, in the opinion of the committee, last for four weeks in the absence of definite knowledge as to when the infection ends. Children from infected families should not be allowed to go to school until the quarantine is abandoned. The transportation or transfer of acute cases in public conveyances should be...
Page 518 - ... a physical malady. As will appear from the psychoanalysis, there are other worries which she did not at first reveal. Onset. She had no unusual worry at the time, she declares ; but on account of straightened finances and the delicacy of her mother, she has been anxious for some years. As a result of psychoanalysis, it was ascertained that three months before the tic there had occurred a serious unpleasantness with a comrade in the office, whom she stigmatized as an ignorant, conscienceless woman....
Page 520 - But the psychological factor is the main one, as will appear ; for the torticollis is proportional to the insistence of the thought of her painful relationship with her fellow worker, and when she succeeds in dismissing this from her mind the tic rarely occurs. This, however, has been difficult, because she had no confidence, not being willing to trouble her tired sister, as had been her habit, and a clergyman to whom she was much attached having left Washington. Hence, there was no relief from brooding...
Page 744 - that we could be moved by the solicitations of pleasure and have no experience of pain, would be to place us where injuries would meet us at every step and in every motion, and, whether felt or not, would be destructive to life. To suppose that we are to move and act, without experience of resistance and of pain, is to suppose not only that man's nature is changed, but the whole of exterior nature also. There must be nothing to bruise the body or hurt the eye, nothing noxious to be drawn in with...
Page 868 - ... incidents, but we take the sum total. If we take the sum total of the activities of the medical profession, if we subtract all its shortcomings, if we admit even everything our enemies say about us, the balance of good is overwhelmingly in its favor, and it can truthfully be said to be the most beneficent, the most progressive, the most humane and the most altruistic of all professions. And therefore to the question: What Is the matter with the doctors?
Page 744 - ... man's nature be changed, but the whole of the exterior nature also. There must be nothing to bruise the body or hurt the eye, nothing noxious to be drawn in with the breath. In short, it is to imagine altogether another state of existence. Pain is the necessary contrast to pleasure; it ushers us into existence or consciousness; it alone is capable of exciting the organs into activity. It is the companion and guardian of human life. In a broader conception...

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