Mortimer Delmar; and Highfield tower, by the author of 'Conrad Blessington'. (Google eBook)

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Page 353 - One fatal remembrance, one sorrow that throws Its bleak shade alike o'er our joys and our woes, To which life nothing darker or brighter can bring, For which joy has no balm and affliction no sting...
Page 217 - How lov'd, how honour'd once, avails thee not, To whom related, or by whom begot ; A heap of dust alone remains of thee, 'Tis all thou art, and all the proud shall be ! Poets themselves must fall, like those they sung, Deaf the prais'd ear, and mute the tuneful tongue.
Page 167 - Tis sweet to hear the watchdog's honest bark Bay deep-mouthed welcome as we draw near home; Tis sweet to know there is an eye will mark Our coming, and look brighter when we come...
Page 222 - O woman ! in our hours of ease, Uncertain, coy, and hard to please, And variable as the shade By the light, quivering aspen made ; When pain and anguish wring the brow, A ministering angel thou...
Page 235 - The dew of the morning Sunk chill on my brow; It felt like the warning Of what I feel now. Thy vows are all broken, And light is thy fame: I hear thy name spoken And share in its shame. They name thee before me, A knell to mine ear; A shudder comes o'er me Why wert thou so dear? They know not I knew thee Who knew thee too well : Long, long shall I rue thee Too deeply to tell.
Page 227 - That hath loved thee so long, In wealth and woe among ? And is thy heart so strong As for to leave me thus ? Say nay, say nay ! And wilt thou leave me thus, That hath given thee my heart, Never for to depart, Neither for pain nor smart; And wilt thou leave me thus ? Say nay, say nay ! And wilt thou leave me thus And have no more pity Of him that loveth thee?
Page 223 - But happy they, the happiest of their kind, Whom gentler stars unite, and in one fate Their hearts, their fortunes, and their beings blend. 'Tis not the coarser tie of human laws, Unnatural oft, and foreign to the mind, That binds their peace ; but harmony itself, Attuning all their passions into love . Where friendship...
Page 60 - Tis true, your budding Miss is very charming, But shy and awkward at first coming out, So much alarmed, that she is quite alarming, All Giggle, Blush ; half Pertness, and half Pout ; And glancing at Mamma, for fear there's harm in What you, she, it, or they, may be about, The Nursery still lisps out in all they utter Besides, they always smell of bread and butter.
Page 304 - On his bold visage middle age Had slightly pressed its signet sage, Yet had not quenched the open truth And fiery vehemence of youth ; Forward and frolic glee was there, The will to do, the soul to dare, The sparkling glance, soon blown to fire, Of hasty love or headlong ire.
Page 194 - Was as a mockery of the tomb, Whose tints as gently sunk away As a departing rainbow's ray; An eye of most transparent light, That almost made the dungeon bright, And not a word of murmur not A groan o'er his untimely lot...

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