The Politics of Iowa During the Civil War and Reconstruction (Google eBook)

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Clio Press, 1911 - Iowa - 204 pages
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Page 149 - The conspiracy is now known. Armies have been raised, war is levied to accomplish it. There are only two sides to the question. Every man must be for the United States or against it. There can be no neutrals in this war; only patriots or traitors.
Page 94 - ... order of the towns to be determined by lot,) to select the candidates as far as may be from the several towns in the ratio of their representation in the House of Representatives, and from that class of persons who otherwise would not have the means of providing themselves with the like benefits ; and that the Governor and Secretary of State be, and they are hereby, instructed to select candidates from the names presented, in such manner as that whenever for any reason any town shall not have...
Page 94 - States, and 75,000 militia, for three months' service, were called to suppress said combinations and to cause the laws to be duly executed. In addition, all loyal citizens were appealed to that they might favor, facilitate, and aid the effort to maintain "the honor, the integrity, and the existence of our National Union, and the perpetuity of popular government, and to redress wrongs already long enough endured." The President deemed it proper to add, that the first service of the forces would, probably,...
Page 70 - The platform presented, so generally satisfactory as it has proved, is eminently due to John A. Kasson of Iowa, whose efforts to reconcile differences, and to secure the largest liberty of sentiment consistent with fidelity to Republican principles, were most effective and untiring. I think no former platform ever reflected more fairly and fully the average convictions of a great National party.
Page 94 - Government may demand to suppress treason and subdue rebellion, enforce the laws, protect the lives and property of all loyal citizens, and maintain inviolate the Constitution and sovereignty of the Nation.
Page 165 - ... of Slavery, although I might regret that the war of its own producing had left in it enough of life to leave it to be our bane and pest in the future as it has been in the past. But while this is true, it is also true that if I had the power on to-morrow to end this terrible strife and preserve our Union by the extinction of Slavery, while to preserve both would require a month's, or a week's, or a day's, or an hour's further war, the spending of a single additional dollar or the loss of a single...
Page 71 - ... Southern people as to the intention of the people of the free States to interfere with slavery in the States, and would have finally disposed of all the territory belonging to the Government. They would have made two very inconvenient States, but they would have settled a very inconvenient question. They could have been adopted without any surrender of principle by anybody or any section, and therefore without any party and personal humiliation.
Page 161 - ... in the military service of this state or of the United States, shall be entitled to vote at all...
Page 35 - Club. name. In 1898 a more formal organization was effected by the adoption of a constitution and the election of officers. Mrs. Ellis Ring was the first president, and to her energy and enthusiasm much of the later success of the club is due. At present the chair of president is most ably filled by Mrs. Belle H. Worcester. During the past three years, the club has studied in turn Holland, Scotland, and England, and the...
Page 80 - Cheboygan counties not now included in said districts, and to remove the office from Detroit to some point convenient and accessible to the vacant lands ; Be it further resolved, That our Senators and Representatives in Congress be and are hereby urged to use all honorable means to effect the object desired ; Be it further resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to the Honorable Secretary of the Interior and the Commissioner of the General Land Office, and to each of our Senators...

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