The Novels of Jane Austen, Volume 2

Front Cover
BiblioBazaar, 2009 - History - 292 pages
11 Reviews
This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

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Review: The Oxford Illustrated Jane Austen: 6-Volume Set

User Review  - A - Goodreads

I have been a fan of Jane Austen for years. It a great day when my daughters decided to read her books. She was a person with amazing insight on human nature. Read full review

Review: The Oxford Illustrated Jane Austen: Volume VI: Minor Works

User Review  - Judine - Goodreads

I enjoyed looking at the process of writing that is illustrated by the works written by the young Jane Austen. Her wit and sarcasm were firmly grounded from the very beginning, and there were a few ... Read full review

About the author (2009)

Jane Austen's life is striking for the contrast between the great works she wrote in secret and the outward appearance of being quite dull and ordinary. Austen was born in the small English town of Steventon in Hampshire, and educated at home by her clergyman father. She was deeply devoted to her family. For a short time, the Austens lived in the resort city of Bath, but when her father died, they returned to Steventon, where Austen lived until her death at the age of 41. Austen was drawn to literature early, she began writing novels that satirized both the writers and the manners of the 1790's. Her sharp sense of humor and keen eye for the ridiculous in human behavior gave her works lasting appeal. She is at her best in such books as Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1816), in which she examines and often ridicules the behavior of small groups of middle-class characters. Austen relies heavily on conversations among her characters to reveal their personalities, and at times her novels read almost like plays. Several of them have, in fact, been made into films. She is considered to be one of the most beloved British authors.

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