A General Pronouncing and Explanatory Dictionary of the English Language: To which is Added, a Vocabulary of Scripture Proper Names, &c (Google eBook)

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Peter Hill, 1814 - English language - 407 pages
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Page xxxi - When the proud steed shall know why man restrains His fiery course, or drives him o'er the plains; When the dull ox, why now he breaks the clod, Is now a victim, and now Egypt's god: Then shall man's pride and dulness comprehend His actions', passions', being's use and end; Why doing, sufFring, check'd, impell'd; and why This hour a slave, the next a deity.
Page xxxi - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Page xxiv - These are thy glorious works, Parent of good, Almighty, thine this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair; thyself how wondrous then ! Unspeakable, who sitt'st above these heavens, To us invisible, or dimly seen In these thy lowest works; yet these declare Thy goodness beyond thought, and power divine.
Page xxiv - As we perceive the shadow to have moved along the dial, but did not perceive it moving ; and it appears that the grass has grown, though nobody ever saw it grow : so the advances we make in knowledge, as they consist of such minute steps, are only perceivable by the distance gone over.
Page xxxv - Man's happiness, or misery, are, in a great measure put into his own hands. Man is not such a machine as a clock or a watch, which move merely as they are moved.
Page xxxi - Ten Censure wrong for one who Writes amiss ; A Fool might once himself alone expose, Now One in Verse makes many more in Prose. 'Tis with our Judgments as our Watches, none Go just alike...
Page xxx - What could make a stronger impression,' says he, ' than those exclamations of Gracchus ?" Whither shall I turn ? Wretch that I am! to what place betake myself? Shall I go to the Capitol ? Alas ! it is overflowed with my brother's blood. Or shall I retire to my house ? Yet there I behold my mother plunged in misery, weeping and despairing!
Page xxv - At the same time that I think discretion the most useful talent a man can be master of, I look upon cunning to be the accomplishment of little, mean, ungenerous minds. Discretion points out the noblest ends to us, and pursues the most proper and laudable methods of attaining them. Cunning has only private selfish aims, and sticks at nothing which may make them succeed.
Page xxx - Then came one and told them, saying, Behold, the men whom ye put in prison are standing in the temple, and teaching the people.
Page xxiv - The discourse consisted of two parts : in the first was shown the necessity of fighting ; in the second, the advantages that would arise from it.

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