Veterinary Virology (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Academic Press, Oct 27, 1999 - Medical - 629 pages
3 Reviews
Completely rewritten, this edition has expanded coverage of zoonotic viruses and the diseases they cause, and viruses and viral diseases of laboratory animals, poultry, fish, and wildlife. The concept of new emerging and reemerging viral diseases reflects the new perspective this concept has brought to veterinary and zoonotic virology and related fields.
Part I presents fundamental principles of virology related to animal infection and disease. Part II details the properties and clinical features of the viruses that afflict animals and describes their treatment and control.

Key Features
* Comprehensive coverage of animal viruses, viral diseases, and viral zoonoses
* Covers veterinary and zoonotic virology from the perspective of pathogenesis of viral infections, as well as from the perspective of disease prevention and control
  

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penting!!!

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VERY ENLIGHTENING BECAUSE I AM DOING A PROJECT ON VETERINARY VACCINES

Contents

Veterinary and Zoonotic Viral Diseases
275
Glossary
601

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 2 - About the only genuine sporting proposition that remains unimpaired by the relentless domestication of a once free-living human species is the war against these ferocious little fellow creatures, which lurk in the dark corners and stalk us in the bodies of rats, mice, and all kinds of domestic animals; which fly and crawl with the insects, and waylay us in our food and drink and even in our love.
Page 2 - ... being done. As a matter of fact, men go into this branch of work from a number of motives, the last of which is a selfconscious desire to do good. The point is that it remains one of the few sporting propositions left for individuals who feel the need of a certain amount of excitement. Infectious disease is one of the few genuine adventures left in the world.
Page 23 - National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health...

About the author (1999)

Frederick A. Murphy, DVM, PhD, is professor, Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB), Galveston. He holds a BS and DVM from Cornell University and a PhD from the University of California, Davis (UC Davis). Formerly he was dean and distinguished professor, School of Veterinary Medicine, and distinguished professor, School of Medicine, UC Davis. Before that he served as director of the National Center for Infectious Diseases, and director of the Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and is a member of the German National Academy of Sciences and the Belgian Royal Academy of Medicine. He holds an honorary Doctor of Medicine and Surgery from the University of Turku, Finland; an honorary Doctor of Science from the University of Guelph, Canada; an honorary Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of London, United Kingdom; an honorary Doctor of Science from University College Dublin, Ireland; the Presidential Rank Award of the U.S. Government; the PennVet World Leadership Award from the University of Pennsylvania, and the Distinguished Microbiologist Award from the American College of Veterinary Microbiologists. At UTMB, he is a member of the Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Galveston National Laboratory, and McLaughlin Endowment for Infection and Immunity. His professional interests include the pathology and epidemiology of highly pathogenic viruses/viral diseases: rabies and the rabies-like viruses, arboviruses, hemorrhagic fever viruses, and other neurotropic viruses. He has been a leader in advancing the concepts of “new and emerging infectious diseases and “new and emerging zoonoses and “the threat posed by bioterrorism. Most recently, he has been working on Internet resources on the history of virology: “The Foundations of Virology at http://www.utmb.edu/virusimages/.