The Design of Everyday Things

Front Cover
Basic Books, 2002 - Technology & Engineering - 257 pages
388 Reviews
First, businesses discovered quality as a key competitive edge; next came service. Now, Donald A. Norman, former Director of the Institute for Cognitive Science at the University of California, reveals how smart design is the new competitive frontier. The Design of Everyday Things is a powerful primer on how--and why--some products satisfy customers while others only frustrate them.

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Great premise--OK execution - Goodreads
Fantastic introduction to interface design. - Goodreads
Great book for simple but obvious insights. - Goodreads
The basic premise though has not changed. - Goodreads
First of all, the book references illustrations. - Goodreads

Review: The Design of Everyday Things

User Review  - Fab - Goodreads

Wow. This is definitely a book worth reading for anyone that is involved with making products. After reading this you will see the world a little differently and begin to better notice both good and bad design. Read full review

Review: The Design of Everyday Things

User Review  - Elliot Jackson - Goodreads

Despite most of the examples given no longer being relevant (he writes about pay phones, VCRs and explains what a mouse is), this is still a good UX book that's worthwhile reading if you build things. Read full review

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About the author (2002)

Donald A. Norman is Professor of Computer Science at Northwestern University, a former “Apple Fellow,” and a partner in the Nielsen Norman Group Consulting Firm, which consults with corporations on design. He is the author of a number of books on design, including Emotional Design and the best-selling The Design of Everyday Things. He lives in Northbrook, Illinois and Palo Alto, California.

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