The Story of the Zulu Campaign (Google eBook)

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S. Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington, 1880 - Great Britain - 408 pages
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Page 65 - Our indiscretion sometimes serves us well, When our deep plots do pall: and that should teach us, There's a divinity that shapes our ends, Rough-hew them how we will.
Page ix - A mind well skilled to find, or forge a fault ; A turn for punning call it Attic salt ; To JEFFREY go, be silent and discreet, His pay is just ten sterling pounds per sheet...
Page viii - Their praise is hymn'd by loftier harps than mine : Yet one I would select from that proud throng, Partly because they blend me with his line, And partly that I did his sire some wrong, And partly that bright names will hallow song ; And his was of the bravest, and when shower'd The death-bolts deadliest the thinn'd files along, Even where the thickest of war's tempest lower'd, They reach'd no nobler breast than thine, young, gallant Howard!
Page 108 - The confirming officer has further recorded his reasons for withholding his approval and confirmation in the following terms : ' Had I released this officer without making any remarks upon the verdict in question, it would have been a tacit acknowledgment that I concurred in what appears to me a monstrous theory, viz., that a regimental officer who is the only officer present with a party of soldiers actually and seriously engaged with the enemy can, under any pretext whatever, be justified in...
Page 108 - Had I released this officer without making any remarks upon the verdict in question, it would have been a tacit acknowledgment that I concurred in what appears to me a monstrous theory, viz., that a regimental officer who is the only officer present with a party of soldiers actually and seriously engaged with the enemy, can, under any pretext whatever, be justified in deserting them, and by so doing, abandoning them to their fate. The more helpless...
Page 327 - The eastern portion of Bailunda is moderately level, with rocky hills, on the summits of which are situated the villages of the chiefs ; but, as the western portion is reached, the country breaks into mountains of every shape and form, among which are needles and cones of granite. In the foreground the hills are of red sandstone, crowned with groves of magnificent trees, festooned with jasmines and other sweet-scented creepers.
Page 325 - Light is admitted only through the door, which also provides the sole means for the escape of smoke, and, as a consequence, the rafters and walls are black and shiny, and the cobwebs with which they are festooned are loaded with soot. Among the rafters, walking-sticks, bows, spears, knobsticks, and arrows are stored, to become seasoned by the smoke. As may be expected, these dwellings are infested with vermin, the worst being enormous ticks, the bite of which is so annoying that the Arabs believe...
Page 61 - ... reverse, and was so heavy that we suffered very severely, and about 6 pm were forced to retire behind the retrenchment of biscuit boxes. All this time the enemy had been attempting to force the hospital, and shortly after set fire to its roof. The garrison of the hospital defended it room by room, bringing out all the sick who could be moved before they retired, Privates WILLIAMS, HOOK, R. JONES, and W. JONES, 24th Regiment, being the last men to leave holding the doorway with the bayonet, their...
Page 22 - ... of them. The chief distinction is between married and unmarried men. No one in Zululand, male or female, is permitted to marry without the direct permission of the King, and when he allows a regiment to do so, which is not before the men are about 40 years of age, they have to shave the crown of the head, and to put a ring round it, and then they become one of the "white" regiments, carrying white shields etc.
Page 18 - ... home and, though in the circumstances of his departure he had been treated with chivalrous courtesy by Cetshwayo, he took an active part on the English side. On January 4 Sir Bartle Frere issued a notification requesting the General to take the necessary steps to protect the British territory from aggression, and to compel the Zulu king to comply with all the demands of the ultimatum, but added that up to January 11 Lord Chelmsford would be willing to receive an intimation of the king's absolute...

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