Murray's English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Selected from the Best Writers ... With a Few Preliminary Observations on the Principles of Good Reading; Improved by the Addition of a Concordant and Synonymising Vocabulary ... Divided, Defined, and Pronounced According to the Principles of John Walker ... Walker's Pronouncing Key, which Governs the Vocabulary, is Prefixed to this Work (Google eBook)

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Published and sold by Samuel Newton, 1825 - Readers - 302 pages
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Page 293 - Lives through all life, extends through all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent: Breathes in our soul, informs our mortal part, As full, as perfect, in a hair as heart; As full, as perfect, in vile man that mourns, As the rapt seraph that adores and burns: To him no high, no low, no great, no small; He fills, he bounds, connects, and equals all.
Page 281 - Where slaves once more their native land behold, No fiends torment, no Christians thirst for gold. To be, contents his natural desire, He asks no angel's wing, no seraph's fire ; But thinks, admitted to that equal sky, His faithful dog shall bear him company.
Page 266 - Through hidden dangers, toils, and deaths, it gently clear'd my way, And through the pleasing snares of vice, more to be fear'd than they.
Page 112 - When the ear heard me, then it blessed me; and when the eye saw me, it gave witness to me: 'Because I delivered the poor that cried, and the fatherless, and him that had none to help him. 'The blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon me: and I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy.
Page 102 - As long as the earth endures, seedtime and harvest, cold and heat, summer and winter, day and night, shall not cease.
Page 266 - WHEN all thy mercies, O my God! My rising soul surveys, Transported with the view, I'm lost In wonder, love, and praise.
Page 244 - I would not enter on my list of friends (Though graced with polished manners and fine sense Yet wanting sensibility) the man Who needlessly sets foot upon a worm.
Page 132 - And Joseph said unto his brethren, Come near to me, I pray you. And they came near. And he said, I am Joseph your brother, whom ye sold into Egypt. Now therefore be not grieved, nor angry with yourselves, that ye sold me hither: for God did send me before you to preserve life.
Page 293 - All Nature is but art, unknown to thee All chance, direction, which thou canst not see; All discord, harmony not understood; All partial evil, universal good: And, spite of pride, in erring reason's spite, One truth is clear, Whatever is, is right.
Page 281 - Pride, our error lies; All quit their sphere, and rush into the skies. Pride still is aiming at the blest abodes, Men would be Angels, Angels would be Gods. Aspiring to be Gods, if Angels fell, Aspiring to be Angels, Men rebel: And who but wishes to invert the laws Of Order, sins against th

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