The Works of Jonathan Swift, D.D., Dean of St. Patrick's, Dublin, Volume 17 (Google eBook)

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C. Bathurst, C. Davis, C. Hitch and L. Hawes, J. Hodges, R. and J. Dodsley, and W. Bowyer., 1766
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Contents

Le Clerc to Mr Addison
39
Archbishop King to Dr Swift
41
Dr Swift to the Lord Primate Dr Marsh
43
Mr Addison to Dr Swift
44
Mr Addison to Dr Swift
46
Letter Pag XXI Mr Steele to Dr Swift
48
Mr Addison to Dr Swift
50
Dr Swift to Dr Sterne
51
Sir Andrew Fountain to Dr Swift
53
Mr Addison to Dr Swift
54
Irish Bishops to the Bishops of Ossory c
55
Dr Swift to Mrs Dingley
57
Archbishop King to Dr Swift
59
Dr Swift to Dr Sterne
62
A Memorial of Dr Swift to Mr Harley about Firstfruits
65
Dr Swift to Archbishop King
69
Archbishop King to Dr Swift
73
Power from the Lord Primate and Arch bishop King
75
Archbishop King to Dr Swift
76
Archbishop King to Dr Swift
78
Archbishop King to Dr Swift
81
Lord Bolingbroke to Dr Swift
84
Dr Swift to Lord Bolingbroke
85
Archbishop King to Dr Swift
88
Mr Nelson to Dr Swift with Lord Berke leys inscription indorsed on the back
89
Archbishop King to Dr Swift
91
Lord Peterborow to Dr Swift
93
Archbishop King to Dr Swift
96
Archbishop King to Dr Swift
101
Lord Peterborow to Dr Swift
107
Archbishop King to Dr Swift no XLVII Archbishop King to Dr Swift 113
113
Archbishop King to Dr Swift
117
Archbishop King to Dr Swift
125
Archbishop King to Dr Swift
128
Archbishop King to Dr Swift
134
Letter Pagfc LII Archbishop King to Dr Swift
135
Archbishop King to Dr Swift
137
Lord Bolingbroke to Dr Swift
148
Dr Sacheverell to Dr Swift
149
Dr Swiftto Mrs Johnson
151
Dr Swift to Mrs Dingley
195
Dr Swift to Mrs Johnson
204
Dr Swift to Mrs Dingley
205
Dr Swift to Mrs Dingley
207
Dr Swift to Mrs Dingley
210
Dr Swift to Mrs Dingley
214
Dr Swift to Mrs Dingley
218
Dr Swift to Mrs Dingley
221
Dr Swift to Mrs Dingley
224
Dr Swift to Mrs Dingley
229
Dr Swift to Mrs Johnson
236
Dr Swift to Mrs Dingley
242
Lady Orkney to Dr Swift
249
Lady Orkney to Dr Swift
250
Lady Orkney to Dr Swift
251
Dr Swift to Mrs Dingley
328
LXXXVI
339
Mr Hunter to Dr Swift LXXXVII Mr Hunter to Dr Swift LXXXVIII Dr Swift to Mrs Dingfey
342
Mr Prior to Dr Swift t XCII Lord Poulet to Dr Swift
384
Dr Swift to Mrs Dingley _ 38 c
385
Sir Thomas Hanmer to Dr Swift
387
Mr Lewis to Dr Swift
388
Reverend Mr Sharpe to Dr Swift
389
Dr Swift to Mrs Dingley _ 301
393
Mr Lewis to Dr Swift opr CI Mr Lewis to Dr Swift _ 306
396
Mr Lewis to Dr Swift 300
404
Dr Davcnant to Dr Swift
406
Duchess of Ormond to Dr Swift
408
Dr Swift to Bp Sterne 0g CX Lord Primate Lindsay to Dr Swift
412
Lord Primate Lindsay to Dr Swift
415
Lord Chancellor Phipps to Dr Swift
417
Par of Anglesey to Dr Swift
420
CX1V Earl of Peterborow to Dr Swift
422
Lord Oxford to Dr Swiff
426
CXVI An Informer to Lord Oxford
427
Humorous Lines by Lord Oxford
428
Humorous Lines by Lord Oxford
430
Duchcfb of Ormond to Dr Swift
431
tter Pagt CXXI Mr Charlton to Dr Swift
433
Mr Gay to Dr Swift
437
Dr Swift to Miss Vanhomrigh
439
Alderman Barber to Dr Swift
441
Dr Arbuthnott to Dr Swift
442
Mr Harley to Dr Swift T
445
Mr Thomas to Dr Swift
447
Dr Arbuthnott to Dr Swift
448
Alderman Barber to Dr Swift
453
Alderman Barber to Dr Swift
454
Mr Thomas Secretary to Lord Trea surer to Dr Swift
455
Mr Lewis to Dr Swift r
456
Mr Ford to Dr Swift
459
Mr Ford to Dr Swift
463
Dr Arbuthnott to Dr Swift
466
Lord Bolingbroke to Dr Swift
469
Mr Lewis to Dr Swift
470
Lord Harley to Dr Swift
473
Dr Arbuthnott to Dr Swift
474
Mr Ford to Dr Swift
477
Mr Lewis to Dr Swift
480
Mr Ford to Dr Swift
482
Mr Ford to Dr Swift
484
Mr Lewis to Dr Swift
485
Dr Arbuthnott to Dr Swift
487
Lord Oxford to Dr Swift
489
Mr Lewis to Dr Swift
493
Mr Lewis to Dr Swift
495
Alderman Barber to Dr Swift 496
496
Mr Lewis to Dr Swift
497
Mr Ford to Dr Swift
498
? CLIV
504

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 388 - I am now fitter to look after willows, and to cut hedges, than to meddle with affairs of state. I must order one of the workmen to drive those cows out of my island, and make up the ditch again ; a work much more proper for a country vicar, than driving out factions, and fencing against them.
Page 240 - ... to be a greater loser in all regards. She has moved my very soul. The lodging was inconvenient, and they would have removed her to another ; but I would not suffer it, because it had no room backward, and she must have been tortured with the noise of the Grub street screamers mentioning her husband's murder in her ears.
Page ix - Those from the Dean to Mrs. Johnson and Mrs. Dingley are part of the journal mentioned in his life ; and from them alone a better notion may be formed of his manner and character than from all that has been written about him.
Page 367 - Lord Bolingbroke made me dine with him to-day, (I was as good company as ever) and told me the Queen would determine something for me to-night. The dispute is Windsor, or St. Patrick's. I told him I would not stay for their disputes, and he thought I was in the right.
Page 366 - Lewis's office, came to me, and said many things too long to repeat. I told him I had nothing to do but go to Ireland immediately; for I could not, with any reputation, stay longer here, unless I had something honourable immediately given to me.
Page 487 - I was resolved to stay till I could tell you the queen had got so far the better of the dragon, as to take her power out of his hands. He has been the most ungrateful man to her, and to all his best friends, that ever was born.
Page 434 - I desire him not to alter any of his methods for me, so we dine exactly between twelve and one. At eight we have some bread and butter and a glass of ale, and at ten he goes to bed. Wine is a stranger, except a little I sent him ; of which, one evening in two, we have a pint between us.
Page 271 - I met Mr. Addison and Pastoral Philips on the Mall to-day, and took a turn with them ; but they both looked terribly dry and cold. A curse of party ! And do you know I have taken more pains to recommend the Whig wits to the favour and mercy of the ministers than any other people. Steele I have kept in his place. Congreve I have got to be used kindly, and secured.
Page 221 - Medleys are jumbled together with the Flying Post ; the Examiner is deadly sick ; the Spectator keeps up, and doubles its price ; I know not how long it will hold. Have you seen the red stamp the papers are marked with ? Methinks it is worth a halfpenny, the stamping it.
Page 239 - I could not be spared, which was true. They have removed the poor duchess to a lodging in the neighbourhood, where I have been with her two hours, and am just come away. I never saw so melancholy a scene; for indeed all reasons for real grief belong to her; nor is it possible for anybody to be a greater loser in all regards.

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