The Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets: With Critical Observations on Their Works, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

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C. Bathurst, 1783 - English poetry
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Review: The Lives of the Poets: Boxed Set

User Review  - Richard Epstein - Goodreads

It is not Johnson's fault that I am not included: I came along too late for that. Notwithstanding this unavoidable, but lamentable, omission, this is among the very greatest of biographical works, endlessly entertaining and informed by wisdom. Read full review

Review: The Lives of the Poets: Boxed Set

User Review  - Jonathan - Goodreads

The critical gold standard, of course, at the gold standard price of $650. Happily there are cheaper editions. Read full review

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Page 333 - though it be not equal to the former: I have found out a gift for my fair; I have found where the wood-pigeons breed ; But let me that plunder forbear, She will fay 'twas a barbarous deed: For he ne'er could be true, fhe averr'd, Who could rob a poor bird of its young; And I lov'd
Page 171 - If the flights of Dry den therefore are higher, Pope continues longer on the wing. If of Dryden's fire the blaze is brighter, of Pope's the heat is more regular and conftant. Dryden often furpaffes expectation, and Pope never falls below it. Dryden is read with frequent aftonifhment, and Pope with perpetual delight, This parallel will, I hope, when it is well
Page 66 - and had given him ten guineas after " they were publifhed. The next day , while " I was heated with what I had heard, I " Wrote a Letter to Mr. Addifon, to let him " know that I was not unacquainted with this " behaviour of his; that if I was to fpeak
Page 440 - in medical reputation, but never attained any great extent of practice, or eminence of popularity. A phyfician in a great city feems to be the mere play-thing of Fortune; his degree of reputation is, for the moft part, totally cafual : they that employ him, know not his excellence; they that reject him, know not his
Page 228 - and not a mafter taught, Whofe art was nature, and whofe pictures thought} Now for two ages, having fnatch'd from fate Whate'er was beauteous, or whate'er was great, Lies crown'd with Princes honours. Poets lays, Due to his merit, and brave thirft of praife. Living, great Nature fear'd he might outvie
Page 82 - them, either the bookfellers would " not find their account in employing them, " or the men themfelves, when difcovered, " want courage to proceed in fo unlawful an " occupation. This it was that gave birth "to the. Dunciad; and he thought it an " happinefs, that, by the late flood of flander " on himfelf, he had acquired fuch a
Page 231 - and friend to learned cafe, Content with fcience in the vale of peace. Calmly he look'd on either life ; and here Saw nothing to regret, or there to fear ; From Nature's temperate feaft rofe fatisfy'd, Thank'd heaven that he had liv'd, and that he dy'd. The
Page 330 - in living againft his will in " retirement, and in a place which his tafte " had adorned; but which he only enjoyed " when people of note came to fee and com" mend it: his correfpondence is about no" thing elfe but this place and his own " writings, with two or three neighbouring " clergymen, who wrote verfes too."
Page 49 - in their tents the Grecian leaders lie; Th' Immortals flumber'd on their thrones above, All but the ever-watchful eye of Jove, To honour Thetis' fon he bends his care, And plunge the Greeks in all the woes of war. Then bids an empty phantom rife to fight, And thus commands the vifion of the night:
Page 171 - neceffity; he compofed without confideration, and publifhed without correction. What his mind could fupply at call, or gather in one excurfion, was all that he fought, and all that he gave. The dilatory caution of Pope enabled him to condenfe his fentiments, to multiply his images, and to accumulate all that ftudy might produce, or chance might fupply. If the flights of

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