Elegant Extracts: Or, Useful and Entertaining Passages in Prose: Selected for the Improvement of Young Persons: Being Similar in Design to Elegant Extracts in Poetry (Google eBook)

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B. Law, J. Johnson, C. Dilly, G. G. & J. Robinson, T. Cadell [and 31 others in London], 1797 - 1120 pages
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Contents

Dun of Children to their Parenta
10
Strength of Parental Affection
11
Remarks on the Swiftness of Time
12
Folly of misspending Time
13
Importance of Time
14
j? Panitliment of misspent Time 16 importance nf Time to Youth
16
On a lasy ana trilling Disposition
17
Bad Effects of Indolence
18
Innocent Pleasures of ChilJhood 20 Cacarfiilneis recommended
20
Advantages of a cheerful Temper
21
Character of Pompey Middl 694
22
CONTENTS
25
Titus Quinctius to the Romans
29
Micipsa to Jugurth 700 701 702
30
si On Truth and Sincerity
32
si Relesserthc Knowledge of Ones Self
33
So Life pleasing to God but that which is useful to Mankind Adven
34
Junius Brutus over Lucretia Levy 705 706
35
Adherbal to the Roman Senate Sallust
36
2 Providence proved by Animal Instinct Spell
37
KecrtSty of forming Religious Principles tan early Age Blair
38
of early acquiring virtuous Dispo tioos and Habits
39
Piety to Cod the Foundation of good Morals __
40
Modesty and Docility joined to Piety 12 Sincerity and Truth recommended 33 Benevolence and Humanity
41
Courtesy and engaging Manners 35 Temperance in Pleasure recommended 36 Whatever violates Nature cannot af ford true Pleasure
42
Another
43
Irregular Pleasures bad Effects of si Industry and Application in Youth 3a Employment of Time 1
44
4 41 43
45
44
46
Moral and Relhiout
47
Character of Henry I
48
Character of Stephen
49
Sect Authors Pag 53 Order to be observed in Amusements Blair
50
to be preserved in your Society
51
essential to Selfenjoyment c
52
Suppression of criminal Thoughts 59 Experience anticipated by Refaction 60 Beginnings of Passion to be opposed 61 Government of the Temper 62...
54
Character of John
55
Another
56
Blessings of a contented Temper 65 Usefulness of a Desire of Praise 66 Effects of excessive Deiire of Praise 67 Usefulness of virtuous Diseipine 68 C...
58
Comforts of Religion
59
Propagating Infidelity inexcusable
60
as a Rule of Life and Manners
62
On public Preaching
63
Religion considered as exciting Devo tion
64
True and taile Politeness Hard
65
On Religious Principles Gregory
66
Beauties of the Psalms H rne
67
of Lust
68
of Vanity
69
Operas ridiculed Lyttelfm 879
70
Character of Henry V
71
Gcetlencss not to be confounded with in sincere Politeness Blair
76
Retirement of no Use to some Baling So 1
83
Sect _ Authors
85
Swearing indelicate and wicked
90
Advantages of a Place of Education 47 Discipline cf a Place of Education 48 Irregularities bring Censure 49 DirHdence of ons Abilities approved 48
91
Gentleness conducive to our Interest
92
Superiority of gentle Manners
93
Bad Effects of Pride
94
Violence and Contention caused bv Trifles
95
Gentleness promoted by Religion
96
Gentleness the Ornament of every Age and Station
97
Pungency of guilty Passions
98
Misery arises from the Passions
100
Nature restored by Revelation
101
Depcndance of Mans Happiness
102
Caution on seducing Appearances
103
Religious Enthusiasm
105
to6 Virtue Mans true Interest 107 On Gratitude
107
Religion the Foundation of Content Adven
108
Bad Company Gilpin 83
111
13c134 On Intemperance in Eating 112119
112
not owing to Pedantry
115
Moderns excel the Ancients
116
Excellencies of the Ancients
117
ing 110129
135
Introduction to the Catechism Gils
151
On the Resurrection ofthe Body
157
Behaviour to Superiors
163
OnthcSacramentof the Lords Supper
171
Ridicule
186
The Divine Legation of Moses Lord Fcrba
218
Fulfil nent of the Prophecies in Argument
230
Account of Henry VI
234
The Excellence of Scripture Stilingfeet
236
Prevalence of Christianity an Argument
244
Simplicity of the Gospel gives it an Air
304
Smollett 734
309
PHYSICOTHEOLOG1CAL REFLECTIONS
310
Scriptures the Rule of Life Cbapcvt
344
our Saviours Example Sec 1
350
An Evening Prayer
386
Style general Characters of
392
Moderns
400
Sect Authors 35 Acquaintance with the bell Authors necessary to form a Style Blair
402
PhæJrus 52 Manilius
411
the Poets whose Works have not come down to us
412
His Description of a Seafight
413
Of Persius
414
j9 _ Martial
415
Juvenal
416
The Condition of the Romans in the second Punic War
417
Conquests of the Roman Generals
418
Introduction into Italy of the Works of the ancient Artists
419
Decline of the Arts Eloquence and Poetry on Augustuss Death
420
On Demosthenes Blair
421
71
422
his Defects
423
and Demosthenes compared
424
Mr ans of improving in Eloquence
425
Industry recommended to a Speaker
426
Style of Bolingbrokc and Swift
427
Use of the original ancient Writers
428
On the Entrance to Knowledge j
429
ers compared
430
Commendation of thcLatin Tongue
432
8S Tlic Method of Schools vindicated
433
On forming a Style
434
Mastery of Language
435
Plainness and Perspicuity
436
iS Assiduous Study of the Greek and Reman Classics recommended
447
Excellencies of the ancient Historians
448
On the Beauty of Epistolary Writing
449
Popes and Swifts
450
Pindar the Father of Lyric Poetry
451
Of the Elegiac and Pastoral
452
the Iliad of Homer 138 Odyssey of Homer
454
Beauties of Virjil
455
Homer and Virgil compared 141 On the ancient Writers
456
Homer 143 Theocritus
457
Herodotus 145 Livy
458
Beauties of Herodotus and Livy 147 Perspicuity a principal Beauty of the Classics 14S On Cicero
459
On the Obscuritiea in the Classic 150 Advantages enjoyed by them 151 Ancients Care in selecting Numbers 152 On their making Sound an Echo to t...
462
Translations from them imperfect
463
Peculiar Excellence of the Speeches of the Greeks and Romans
464
On the Funeral Oration of Pericles
465
Sea Authors Pag 156 OaMiiclansSpeechinTacirus Backwjll
466
Xceophont Memoirs of Socrates 1
467
RulnoftheClassicsforConversarion
468
Toe isbordinate Classics not to be oegiccred
469
The Creek inJ Latin Writers to be compared
470
On tie Study of die New Testament
471
16? Greek Author of Ditto
473
Creek and Roman Historical Critics
474
17 Lexicon and Dictionary Compilers anJ Grammarians
475
Rise of Corrective Criticism
476
Criticism of Use to Literature
477
17 Chance p oduccs no Literary Ex cellence
478
Advice to a Beginner in Criticism
480
jJ Monosyllables
482
l9 The Constituent Parts of every Whole merit our Regard
483
Ar J in the Mcnexenus of Plato
485
On the Theory of Whole and Parts
486
What Metaphors the best
487
On Enigmas and Puns
488
Fallacy of the Sufficiency of Genius
489
Connexion ber een Rules and Genius
490
Character of the English Oriental Latin and Greek Languages
491
History c of the Middle Age
494
Account of the Destruction of the Alexandrian Library
495
Syneiiuss subsequent Ac count of
498
Anecdote of the Modern Greeks
499
On the different Modes of History
500
Superior Literature and Knowledge of the Greek and Latin Clergy
502
Opinions on past and present Ages
505
Character of the Man of Business often united with that of the Scholar and Philosopher
508
ProgrelSons of Art disgustful the Ujbcr
509
On Personal Beauty
514
On Conversation 221 On Music 222 On Sculpture and Painting
518
On Architecture 224 Thoughts on Colours and Light 225 On Uniformity
521
On Novelty 227 Originof our general Ideas of Beauty iz 228 Sense Taste and Genius distinguished
522
Thoughts on the Human Capacity
524
History of the Heathen Deities sine 237 Neglect of Oratorical Numbers Fitzoji 238 Upon Grace in Writing 239 Style of Horace in his Moral Writings ...
525
55S
552
le 27 Duke of Bedford
553
Another Character as him 29 Character of Mr Henry Fox 30 Mr Pitt 31 Another Character of him 32 Another 33 Another 34 Speech on reducing t...
555
5S
584
Muuesj
588
Roierts
598
Spiff 60a Pliny
600
Crt
601
6fct
603
Sail
604
Orations Characters and Letters Fl 260 Remarkable Instance of Filial Duty Pl ny
605
Continence of Scipio Africanus Levy
606
On Punctuation Lvwtb
609
73
610
The first Olynthiac Oration 620
611
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Page 12 - Behold, I go forward, but he is not there ; and backward, but I cannot perceive him : on the left hand, where he doth work, but I cannot behold him : he hideth himself on the right hand, that I cannot see him : but he knoweth the way that I take : when he hath tried me, I shall come forth as gold.
Page 531 - Nothing can please many, and please long, but just representations of general nature. Particular manners can be known to few, and therefore few only can judge how nearly they are copied. The irregular combinations of fanciful invention may delight awhile, by that novelty of which the common satiety of life sends us all in quest; but the pleasures of sudden wonder are soon exhausted, and the mind can only repose on the stability of truth.
Page 32 - It is hard to personate and act a part long ; for where truth is not at the bottom, Nature will always be endeavouring to return, and will peep out and betray herself one time or other.
Page 190 - But above all things, my brethren, swear not, neither by heaven, neither by the earth, neither by any other oath: but let your yea be yea ; and your nay, nay; lest ye fall into condemnation.
Page 259 - For we that are in this tabernacle do groan, being burdened : not for that we would be unclothed, but clothed upon, that mortality might be swallowed up of life.
Page 22 - I think it is very wonderful to see persons of the best sense passing away a dozen hours together in shuffling and dividing a pack of cards, with no other conversation but what is made up of a few game phrases, and no other ideas but those of black or red spots ranged together in different figures. Would not a man laugh to hear any one of this species complaining that life is short?
Page 28 - ... it does not give the mind such an exquisite gladness, prevents us from falling into any depths of sorrow. Mirth is like a flash of lightning, that breaks through a gloom of clouds, and glitters for a moment; cheerfulness keeps up a kind of day-light in the mind, and fills it with a steady and perpetual serenity.
Page 2 - What mean, said I, those great flights of birds that are perpetually hovering about the bridge, and settling upon it from time to time? I see vultures, harpies, ravens, cormorants, and among many other feathered creatures several little winged boys, that perch in great numbers upon the middle arches. These, said the Genius, are Envy, Avarice, Superstition, Despair, Love, with the like cares and passions that infest human life.
Page 21 - Several hours of the day hang upon our hands, nay we wish away whole years; and travel through time as through a country filled with many wild and empty wastes, which we would fain hurry over, that we may arrive at those several little settlements or imaginary points of rest which are dispersed up and down in it. If we divide the life...
Page 553 - That the Earl of Halifax was one of the first to favour me ; of whom it is hard to say whether the advancement of the polite arts is more owing to his generosity or his example...

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