The economics of modern cookery: or, A younger son's cookery book (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1900 - Cookery, English - 378 pages
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Page 136 - ... and avoid toughening of the dough. By this time most of the dough will be sticking together in little separate rolls. If in pressing these lumps together they should not only cling together but readily collect about them whatever loose flour there may be, sufficient water will have been added; but as long as the mixture when pressed remains to some degree crumbly, it is a sign that more water is required. A sure sign of its having been properly mixed is that the dough can be rolled into a lump...
Page 116 - The right lung was found to contain a great quantity of soft, grey, tubercular matter, deposited in isolated patches, varying from the size of a pea to that of a small hazel-nut.
Page 29 - ... fifteen minutes; then add water, or stock, to touch the bottom of the meat. Spread a layer of vegetables over the top of the meat and cut a piece of white paper a little larger than the top of the pan; brush this over with oil, butter, or dripping, and lay closely down over the meat and vegetables, so as to keep in all the steam. Put the cover in place and let simmer very gently until done; then remove the cover and paper, and brown the top of the meat in a hot oven. The time of cooking varies...
Page 136 - ... only cling together but readily collect about them whatever loose flour there may be, sufficient water will have been added; but as long as the mixture when pressed remains to some degree crumbly, it is a sign that more water is required. A sure sign of its having been properly mixed is that the dough can be rolled into a lump and the basin wiped out cleanly with it as with a cloth. B. Rolling out: (1) Flour pastry board slightly, lay dough on it and shape into a neat, flat, oblong shape. (2)...
Page 9 - Cookery then is, properly speaking, a branch of applied chemistry. To cook anything, in the narrower sense of the term, means to bring about changes in it by submitting it to the action of heat, and usually of moisture also, which will make it more fitted for food ; and it is on the nature of this action on different materials that the rationale of the cook's art chiefly depends.
Page 105 - ... a saucepan with the ground rice, fresh butter, lemon-rind, and 3 oz. of the sugar, and let these ingredients boil until the mixture is stiff, stirring them continually ; when done, pour it into the bowl where the custard is, mixing both well together. Put the gelatine with the rest of the milk into a saucepan, and let it stand by the side of the fire to dissolve ; boil for a minute or two, stir carefully into the basin, adding 3 oz. more of pounded sugar. When cold, stir in the lemon-juice, which...
Page 11 - ... of both one and the other, however it is begun, should be completed at just such a moderate temperature as will set, but not harden, the aIbumen. That is to say, the soup or stew must be raised to this temperature, after the meat juices have been drawn out by a lower one...
Page 25 - The draining over the pan is one of the principal things to attend to ; if it is neglected, the fat will cling about the fried things, making them both look and taste greasy, whereas if properly drained in the basket to begin with, they will afterwards scarcely mark the paper. When, as is sometimes the case, no frying basket is used, each thing fried should be drained between the spoon or knife, and the edge of the pan.
Page 136 - ... somewhat less than one-fourth cup of very cold water to one cup of flour. Too much water makes the pastry tough. Stir briskly with a knife to mix evenly and avoid toughening of the dough. By this time most of the dough will be sticking together in little separate rolls. If in pressing these lumps together they should not only cling together but readily collect about them whatever loose flour there may be, sufficient water will have been added; but as long as the mixture when pressed remains to...
Page 10 - Whereever these fibres are cut through, the juice oozes out and spreads itself over the surface of the meat. If, as in our first little experiment, the meat is put in cold water, or even in warm water, or exposed to a heat insufficient to set the...

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