The Miscellaneous Works of Oliver Goldsmith, M.B. (Google eBook)

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W. Otridge & Son, F. C. & J. Rivington, 1812
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Page 420 - No traveller returns, puzzles the will And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of ? Thus conscience does make cowards of us all ; And thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought, And enterprises of great pith and moment With this regard their currents turn awry, And lose the name of action.
Page 420 - And by opposing end them ? To die to sleep No more ; and, by a sleep, to say we end The heartache, and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to 'tis a consummation Devoutly to be wish'd. To die to sleep ; To sleep ! perchance to dream : ay, there's the rub ; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come, When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause...
Page 437 - She is the fairies' midwife, and she comes In shape no bigger than an agate-stone On the forefinger of an alderman, Drawn with a team of little atomies Athwart men's noses as they lie asleep : Her waggon-spokes made of long spinners...
Page 420 - For who would bear the whips and scorns of time, The oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely, The pangs of despised love, the law's delay, The insolence of office, and the spurns That patient merit of the unworthy takes, When he himself might his quietus make With a bare bodkin?
Page 206 - Now then, in peaceable possession of what was justly its own, it waited three days with the utmost impatience, repairing the breaches of its web, and taking no sustenance that I could perceive. At last, however, a large blue fly fell into the snare, and struggled hard to get loose. The spider gave it leave to entangle itself as much as possible, but it seemed to be too strong for the cobweb. I must own I was greatly surprised when I saw the spider immediately sally out, and in less than a minute...
Page 46 - I had certain and repeated informations, from some who are in the secret of affairs, that a resolution was taken by those who have power to execute it to pursue me to the scaffold. My blood was to have been the cement of a new alliance, nor could my innocence be any security, after it had once been demanded from abroad and resolved on at home that it was necessary to cut me off.
Page 204 - This insect is formed by nature for a state of war, not only upon other insects, but upon each other. For this state nature seems perfectly well to have formed it. Its head and breast are covered with a strong natural coat of mail, which is impenetrable to the attempts of every other insect, and its belly is enveloped in a soft pliant skin, which eludes the sting even of a wasp.
Page 208 - I am now describing lived three years; every year it changed its skin, and got a new set of legs. I have sometimes plucked off a leg, which grew again in two or three days. At first it dreaded my approach to its web, but at last it became so familiar as to take a fly out of my hand, and upon my touching any part of the web, would immediately leave its hole, prepared either for a defence or an attack.
Page 412 - He, on his side, Leaning half rais'd, with looks of cordial love Hung over her enamour'd, and beheld Beauty, which, whether waking or asleep, Shot forth peculiar graces ; then with voice Mild, as when Zephyrus on Flora breathes Her hand soft touching, whisper'd thus.
Page 435 - Jovemque concilias, tu das epulis accumbere divom, nimborumque facis tempestatumque potentem.' 80 Haec ubi dicta, cavum conversa cuspide montem impulit in latus : ac venti, velut agmine facto, qua data porta, ruunt et terras turbine perflant incubuere mari, totumque a sedibus imis Una Eurusque Notusque ruunt creberque procellis 85 Africus, et vastos volvunt ad litora fluctus.

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