The art of W.A.L.L.-E

Front Cover
Chronicle Books, Apr 30, 2008 - Performing Arts - 160 pages
10 Reviews
Pixar Animation Studios, the innovators behind Toy Story, Finding Nemo, and Ratatouille, created its latest genre-defying film with an intriguing and unorthodox question in mind: What if mankind had to leave Earth, and somebody forgot to turn off the last robot? WALL E (Waste Allocation Load Lifter-Earth Class) is this last, soulful robot. When his lonely work is interrupted by the arrival of the sleek probe-droid EVE, a rollicking adventure across the galaxy ensues.

The Art of WALL E features the myriad pieces of concept art on which this fantastic, futuristic film was built, including storyboards, full-color pastels, digital and pencil sketches, character studies, color scripts, and more. Astute text-featuring quotes from the director, artists, animators, and production team-unearths the filmmakers' historical inspirations and recounts the creative process in intimate detail. This richly illustrated portal into the artistic spirit of Pixar reveals a studio confidently pushing the limits of animation.

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User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Although most Pixar's "art of" series of books are very good or excellent, this one is slightly over a fair rating. The book is full of artwork from several of Pixar's artists. A lot of very early works from pencil to digital (in this case, a lot more digital works than previous books), and to my surprise extremely few watercolour.
It lacks some of the other design, concept and even evolution of works from other excellent Pixar books such as The Art of Finding Nemo. In The Art of Wall.E there are few descriptions of character evolution, few construction, and a fair converage of the work from concept to final stages.
The book is, however, a must for any Pixar enthusiast, and since the movie, to me, is one of Pixar's best, this leverages the book to a fine piece of artwork.
 

Review: The Art of WALL.E

User Review  - Marc Hampson - Goodreads

Great collection of artwork and thoughts behind making this wonderful film. Loved to learn about how they studied silent film for the interactions and the takeaway from that era that contrary to ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1898
Section 2
1935
Section 3
1950
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (2008)

Tim Hauser has been a writer, creative executive, and producer in animation for over 20 years. He lives in Los Angeles.

Andrew Stanton is the director of WALL.E and Finding Nemo, and is the co-director of A Bug's Life.

Bibliographic information