Auntient Lere, a Selection of Aphoristical and Preceptive Passages from the Works of Eminent English Authors of the 16th and 17th Centuries

Front Cover
General Books, 2009 - 166 pages
0 Reviews
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1812 edition. Excerpt: ...gold, silver, wives, or horses: he must not lift up his heart above Ms brethren, Deut. xvii.; and Josephus, paraphrasing upon the place, says, He shall do nothing without the advice of the sanhedrin; or, if he do, they shall oppose him. This agrees with the confession of Zedekiah to the princes (which was the sanhedrin) The king can do nothing without you, Jer. xxxviii. and seems to have been in pursuance of the law of the kingdom, which was written in a book, and laid up before the Lord; and could not but agree with that of Moses, unless they spake by different spirits, or that the spirit by which they did speak, was subject to error or change: and the whole series of God's law shews, that the pride, magnificence, pomp, and glory, usurped by their kings, was.utterly contrary to the will of God. It has been properly enough remarked by one of our legislators, that it is the duty of the nation to supply every just and necessary want of the sovereign, beyond which, h can have no occasion for money, no means for its consumption. At bll events, an accumulation of private property, by the monarch of a free country, may be productive of the greatest danger to the people. What then shall we say to the extraordinary fact of a bill being brought into Parliament by a late minister, sanctioning the appointment of three commissioners, at salaries of, 3000 per annum, each.'.' to take care of the King's private property, and how great must havte been the multiplication of gold, silver, &c. in this instance, when such an enormous sum as POOO a year can be afforded barely for the trouble of looking after it t.. Aloernon Sidney. ARISTOTLE seems to think, that the first nionarchs, having been chosen for their virtue, were little restrained in the...

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Bibliographic information