Understanding Minimalism

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Cambridge University Press, Dec 15, 2005 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 405 pages
2 Reviews
Understanding Minimalism is a state-of-the-art introduction to the Minimalist Program - the current model of syntactic theory within generative linguistics. Accessibly written, it presents the basic principles and techniques of the minimalist program, looking firstly at analyses within Government and Binding Theory (the Minimalist Program's predecessor), and gradually introducing minimalist alternatives. Minimalist models of grammar are presented in a step-by-step fashion, and the ways in which they contrast with GB analyses are clearly explained. Spanning a decade of minimalist thinking, this textbook will enable students to develop a feel for the sorts of questions and problems that minimalism invites, and to master the techniques of minimalist analysis. Over 100 exercises are provided, encouraging them to put these new skills into practice. Understanding Minimalism will be an invaluable text for intermediate and advanced students of syntactic theory, and will set a solid foundation for further study and research within Chomsky's minimalist framework.
  

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Review: Understanding Minimalism (Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics)

User Review  - Brian - Goodreads

A nice clear survey. Walks the reader through both the evidence for Government and Binding theory, and how (and why) this is re-analyzed in Minimalism. Read full review

Contents

The minimalist project
1
12 Some background
2
13 Big facts economy and some minimalist projects
7
14 Using GB as a benchmark
13
15 The basic story line
14
16 Organization of Understanding Minimalism
16
Some architectural issues in a minimalist setting
19
222 Levels of representation
20
63 Bare phrase structure
196
632 The operation Merge
200
633 Revisiting the properties of phrase structure
208
64 The operation Move and the copy theory
212
65 Conclusion
217
Linearization
218
72 Imposing linear order onto XTheory templates
219
73 The Linear Correspondence Axiom LCA
223

223 The Tmodel
22
224 The Projection Principle
23
226 Modules
24
231 Rethinking SStnicture
25
232 Rethinking DStructwe
48
24 The picture so far
72
Theta domains
76
32 External arguments
77
322 The PredicateInternal Subject Hypothesis PISH
80
323 Some empirical arguments for the PISH
81
324 Summary
91
33 Ditransitive verbs
92
332 Verbal shells I
96
333 Verbal shells II
97
34 PISH revisited
101
342 Unaccusalive and unergative verbs
105
35 Conclusion
109
Case domains
111
42 Configurations for Caseassignment within GB
113
43 A unified Spechead approach to Case Theory
116
432 Checking accusative Case under the VPShell Hypothesis
122
433 Checking oblique Case
123
434 PRO and Case Theory
127
44 Some empirical consequences
131
441 Accusative Casechecking and ccommand domains
133
442 Accusative Casechecking and overt object movement
137
45 Conclusion
140
Movement and minimality effects
141
52 Relativized minimality within GB
143
53 The problem
146
54 Minimality and equidistance
148
541 Minimality and equidistance in an Agrbased system
151
542 Minimality and equidistance in an Agrless system
161
55 Relativizing minimality to features
169
56 Conclusion
172
Phrase structure
174
62 XTheory and properties of phrase structure
176
622 Binary branching
179
623 Singlemotherhood
182
624 Barlevels and constituent parts
184
625 Functional heads and XTheory
189
626 Success and clouds
193
74 The LCA and word order variation
235
75 Traces and the LCA
240
76 Conclusion
246
Binding Theory
247
82 Binding Theory phenomena as potential arguments
248
822 Principle A
249
823 Principle B
252
824 Principle C
254
825 Summary
255
83 The copy theory to the rescue
256
831 Reconstruction as LF deletion
257
832 The Preference Principle
264
833 Indices and inclusiveness where does Binding Theory apply after all?
270
834 Idiom interpretation and anaphor binding
272
835 Further issues
276
84 Conclusion
285
Feature interpretability and feature checking
286
93 Feature interpretability and Last Resort
290
932 To be or not to be interpretable that is the question
293
933 A case study of expletives
299
94 Covert movement
302
Move F
304
Agree
317
95 Conclusion
328
Derivational economy
330
preliminary remarks
331
103 Derivational economy and local computations
333
1032 Preference for Merge over Move
335
1033 0relations and economy computations
341
104 The derivation by phase
345
1042 Phases
346
1043 Subarrays
352
1044 Working on the edge
358
105 Economy of lexical resources
363
106 Conclusion
365
Glossary of minimalist definitions
366
References
369
Language index
392
Name index
393
Subject index
397
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About the author (2005)

Norbert Hornstein is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Maryland.

Jairo Nuñes is Associate Professor of Linguistics at the Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil.

Kleanthes Grohmann is Associate Professor of Linguistics at the University of Cyprus.

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