Garden Companion and Florists' Guide (Google eBook)

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Page 4 - Nature never did betray The heart that loved her; 'tis her privilege Through all the years of this our life, to lead From, joy to joy: for she can so inform The mind that is within us, so impress With quietness and beauty, and so feed With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues, Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all The dreary intercourse of daily life, Shall e'er prevail against us, or disturb Our cheerful faith that all which we behold Is...
Page 50 - The seeds yield about eight per cent, of tallow, which sells for about five cents per pound. The process for pressing the oil, which is carried on at the same time, remains to be noticed. It is contained in the kernel of the nut — the sebaceous matter which lies between the shell and the husk having been removed in the manner described. The kernel, and the husk covering it, are ground between two stones, which are heated to prevent clogging from the sebaceous matter still adhering.
Page 50 - With an unimportant exception the candles are always made of what I beg to designate as vegetable stearine. When the candles, which are made by dipping, are of the required diameter, they receive a final dip into a mixture of the same material and insectwax, by which their consistency is preserved in the hottest weather.
Page 50 - ... adapted for receiving wedges, which are successively driven into it by ponderous sledge-hammers wielded by athletic men. The tallow oozes, in a melted state, into a receptacle below, where it cools. It is again melted and poured into tubs smeared with mud to prevent its adhering. It is now marketable, in masses of about eighty pounds each, hard, brittle, white, opaque, tasteless, and without the odor of animal tallow.
Page 50 - Artificial illumination in China is generally procured by vegetable oils ; but candles are also employed by those who can afford it, and for lanterns. In religious ceremonies no other material is used. As no one ventures out after dark without a lantern, and as the gods cannot be acceptably worshipped without candles, the quantity, consumed is very great. With an unimportant exception the candles are always made of what I beg to designate as vegetable stearine.
Page 10 - ovules ' of the other families, we can hardly help extending the same views to them, in which case we should have the remarkable phenomenon of a compound organism, in which a new individual, forming a second generation developed after a process of fertilization, remains attached organically to its parent, from which it differs totally in all anatomical and physiological characters.
Page 50 - The capsules are gently pounded in a mortar, to loosen the seeds from their shells, from which they are separated by sifting. To facilitate th,e separation of the white, sebaceous matter enveloping the seeds, they are steamed in tubs having convex open wicker bottoms, placed over caldrons of boiling water.

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