The Woman Destroyed

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Pantheon Books, 1969 - Fiction - 254 pages
12 Reviews
These three long stories draw us into the lives of three women, all past their first youth, all facing unexpected crises. In the title story, the heroine's serenity is shattered when she learns that her husband is having an affair. In "The Age of Discretion," a successful, happily married professor finds herself increasingly distressed by her son's absorption in his young wife and her worldly values. In "The Monologue," a rich, spoiled woman, home alone on New Year's Eve, pours out a lifetime's rage and frustration in a harrowing diatribe. Enthralling as fiction, suffused with de Beauvoir's remarkable insights into women, The Woman Destroyed gives us a legendary writer at her best.

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Review: The Woman Destroyed

User Review  - Michelle - Goodreads

Although all three stories in this collection are about women between 40 and 65 facing some kind of crisis, and all of them are exquisitely written, they are otherwise very different. In the first ... Read full review

Review: The Woman Destroyed

User Review  - Leslea - Goodreads

I think what I love most about Simone de Beauvoir's work is how she lets herself bleed in even across her fiction. You can tell that most everything in this collection of short stories is influenced ... Read full review

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About the author (1969)

Simone de Beauvoir was born in Paris in 1908. In 1929 she became the youngest person ever to obtain the agrégation in philosophy at the Sorbonne, placing second on the exam to Jean-Paul Sartre. She taught at lycées in Marseille and Rousen from 1931 to 1937, and in Paris from 1938 to 1943. After World War II, she emerged as one of the leaders of the existentialist movement, working with Sartre on Les Temps Modernes. The author of many acclaimed works, de Beauvoir was one of the most influential thinkers of her generation. She died in 1986.

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