Education and the Higher Life (Google eBook)

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A.C. McClurg, 1916 - Education - 210 pages
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Page 204 - I hold you will not compass your poor ends Of barley-feeding and material ease, Without a poet's individualism To work your universal. It takes a soul, To move a body : it takes a high-souled man, To move the masses . . even to a cleaner stye : It takes the ideal, to blow a hair's-breadth off The dust of the actual. Ah, your Fouriers failed, Because not poets enough to understand That life develops from within.
Page 69 - Earth's crammed with heaven, And every common bush afire with God ; But only he who sees takes off his shoes...
Page 169 - Stern Lawgiver! yet thou dost wear The Godhead's most benignant grace; Nor know we anything so fair As is the smile upon thy face: Flowers laugh before thee on their beds And fragrance in thy footing treads; Thou dost preserve the stars from wrong; And the most ancient heavens, through thee, Are fresh and strong.
Page 43 - A lover, not of a part of wisdom, but of the whole; who has a taste for every sort of knowledge and is curious to learn, and is never satisfied; who has magnificence of mind, and is the spectator of all time and all existence...
Page 42 - Then felt I like some watcher of the skies When a new planet swims into his ken; Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes He stared at the Pacific and all his men Looked at each other with a wild surmise Silent, upon a peak in Darien.
Page 59 - A people is but the attempt of many To rise to the completer life of one ; And those who live as models for the mass Are singly of more value than they all.
Page 111 - Poetry is the breath and finer spirit of all knowledge; it is the impassioned expression which is in the countenance of all science.
Page 80 - T is that compels the elements, and wrings A human music from the indifferent air. The greatest gift the hero leaves his race Is to have been a hero. Say we fail! We feed the high tradition of the world, And leave our spirit in our children's breasts.
Page 30 - O Heavens ! how awful is the might of souls, And what they do within themselves while yet The yoke of earth is new to them, the world Nothing but a wild field where they were sown.
Page 10 - On the roaring billows of Time, thou art not engulfed, but borne aloft into the azure of Eternity. Love not Pleasure; love God. This is the Everlasting Yea, wherein all contradiction is solved : wherein whoso walks and works, it is well with him.

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