The Works of Dugald Stewart: The philosophy of the active and moral powers of man (Google eBook)

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Hilliard and Brown, 1829
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Page 306 - I had rather believe all the fables in the legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind ; and, therefore, God never wrought miracle to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it.
Page 251 - Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze, Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees : Lives through all life, extends through all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent...
Page 191 - Look then abroad through Nature, to the range Of planets, suns, and adamantine spheres, Wheeling unshaken through the void immense ; And speak, O man ! does this capacious scene, With half that kindling majesty, dilate Thy strong conception, as when Brutus rose Refulgent from the stroke of...
Page 343 - Pater ipse colendi Haud facilem esse viam voluit, primusque per artem Movit agros curis acuens mortalia corda, Nee torpere gravi passus sua regna veterno.
Page 278 - Hunc solem, et Stellas, et decedentia certis Tempora momentis, sunt qui formidine nulla Imbuti spectent...
Page 58 - ... yet, on the other side, they are more cruel and hard-hearted (good to make severe inquisitors), because their tenderness is not so oft called upon. Grave natures, led by custom, and therefore constant, are commonly loving husbands, as was said of Ulysses, "Vetulam suam praetulit immortalitati.
Page 506 - It is as natural to die as to be born; and to a little infant, perhaps, the one is as painful as the other. He that dies in an earnest pursuit, is like one that is wounded in hot blood; who, for the time, scarce feels the hurt; and therefore a mind fixed and bent upon somewhat that is good, doth avert the dolours of death; but, above all, believe it, the sweetest canticle is, 'Nunc dimittis' when a man hath obtained worthy ends and expectations.
Page 47 - Tis not enough, your counsel still be true ; Blunt truths more mischief than nice falsehoods do ; Men must be taught as if you taught them not, And things unknown propos'd as things forgot.
Page 123 - Thou shalt not lend upon usury to thy brother; usury of money, usury of victuals, usury of any thing that is lent upon usury : unto a stranger thou mayest lend upon usury ; but unto thy brother thou shalt not lend upon usury...
Page 68 - Dear is that shed to which his soul conforms, And dear that hill which lifts him to the storms ; And as a child, when scaring sounds molest, Clings close and closer to the mother's breast, So the loud torrent and the whirlwind's roar But bind him to his native mountains more.

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