41 Stories: 150th Anniversary Edition (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Jul 3, 2007 - Fiction - 432 pages
10 Reviews
The Master of Irony

Readers the world over recognize O. Henry as the best short story writer of the early twentieth century. Widely known as a master of irony, O. Henry also displays here dazzling wordplay and a wry combination of pathos and humor.
  

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Review: 41 Stories

User Review  - Kidi - Goodreads

Can someone tell me which were your favorite? Read full review

Review: 41 Stories

User Review  - Michael - Goodreads

The narrative powers, the ear for flowing yet unforgettable dialogues, and the ability to conjure up dense and mysterious atmospheres with the slightest touches, are second to none. Note: 41 Stories ... Read full review

Contents

THE BIG CITY
19
Schools and Schools
38
BestSeller
55
The Green Door
71
The Enchanted Profile
91
Shearing the Wolf
107
A Retrieved Reformation
126
Conscience in Art
141
The Princess and the Puma
228
The Enchanted Kiss
244
The Lonesome Road
257
Hygeia at the Solito
278
The Rose of Dixie
295
The FoolKiller
314
Two Renegades
337
The Lotus and the Bottle
358

Jeff Peters as a Personal Magnet
156
Telemachus Friend
181
Friends in San Rosario
200
The Sphinx Apple
213
Shoes
383
The Fourth in Salvador
403
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

William Sydney Porter (1862-1910) published all of his work—a novel and some 300 short stories—under the pseudonym 0. Henry. His talent for vivid caricature, local tone, narrative agility, and compassion tempered by irony made him a vastly popular writer in the last decade of his life. He was born in Greensboro, North Carolina, to ordinary middle-class parents and worked in an uncle’s drugstore as a youth, becoming a certified pharmacist. Like many Southerners after the Civil War, he sought his fortune in the West, holding various jobs (newspaper work, clerking in a land office, a teller at an Austin bank). Charged with embezzlement in 1894, he fled to Honduras, returning in 1897 to be with his ill and dying wife. His conviction was caused more by his eluding trial than by the conflicting evidence of theft. In the Ohio State Penitentiary (1898-1901), he began to write the stories that made him famous. He moved to New York, remarried, and kept his identity a secret from all but a few friends. He is buried in Asheville, North Carolina. He is universally honored for his mastery of the short story and for his humane spirit.
Burton Raffel has taught English, Classics, and Comparative Literature at universities in the United States, Israel, and Canada. His books include translations of Beowulf, Horace: Odes, Epodes, Epistles, Satires, The Complete Poetry and Prose of Chairil Anwar, From the Vietnamese, Ten Centuries of Poetry, The Complete Poetry of Osip Emilevich, Mandelstram (with Alla Burago), and Poems From the Old English and The Annotated Milton; several critical studies, Introduction to Poetry, How to Read a Poem, The Development of Modern Indonesian Poetry, and The Forked Tounge: A Study of the Translation Process; and Mia Poems, a volume of his own poetry. Mr. Raffel practiced law on Wall Street and taught in the Ford Foundation’s English Language Teacher Training Project in Indonesia.

Burton Raffel is Distinguished Professor of English at the University of Southwestern Louisiana and author of many books, including Artists All (Penn State, 1991) and The Art of Translating Poetry (Penn State, 1988). He is the translator of Rabelais's Gargantua and Pantagruel (1990), winner of the 1991 French-American Foundation Translation Prize; Balzac's Pere Goriot (1994), and a forthcoming new version of Cervantes's Don Quijote.

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