Be Different: Adventures of a Free-Range Aspergian

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Random House Australia, Apr 1, 2011 - Biography & Autobiography - 304 pages
19 Reviews
Vive la difference! Here are stories and advice to help Aspergians and ordinary geeks alike! The author of the New York Times bestselling Look Me In the Eye returns with endearing stories and actionable advice that will help Aspergians, and even ordinary geeks, embrace being different and work on the things that hold them back in life. With his usual honesty, dry wit, and unapologetic eccentricity, John Robison argues that Asperger's is about difference, not just disability. He offers stories from his own life and the lives of other Aspergians to give the reader a window into the Aspergian mind. Equally important, he offers practical advice - to Aspergians, their parents, and educators - on how Aspergians can improve the weak communication and social skills that keep them from taking full advantage of, or even recognising, their often remarkable gifts.

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Review: Be Different: My Adventures with Asperger's and My Advice for Fellow Aspergians, Misfits, Families, and Teachers

User Review  - Maria Mcclain - Goodreads

Excellent. Great insight and wonderful advice for parents and teachers. Read full review

Review: Be Different: My Adventures with Asperger's and My Advice for Fellow Aspergians, Misfits, Families, and Teachers

User Review  - Carrie Cox - Goodreads

John Elder Robison has fantastic advice and information for those on the autism spectrum and those who seek to help them. Filled with personal stories (like his other books) but put together in a way ... Read full review

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About the author (2011)

John Elder Robison grew up in the 1960s before the diagnosis of Asperger's syndrome existed. Today he has claimed his spot on the autism spectrum; he blogs for Psychology Today and is an adjunct professor at Elms College in Chicopee, Massachusetts. John served on the public review board for the National Institutes of Health, where he considered research proposals to study autism spectrum disorders; is currently involved in autism research at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; and sits on the Scientific Advisory and Scientific Treatment boards of Autism Speaks.

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