Introduction to Attic Greek

Front Cover
University of California Press, 1993 - History - 425 pages
5 Reviews
This thorough presentation of Attic Greek assumes that college students learning the language deserve, from the beginning, full exposure to all the grammar and morphology that they will encounter in actual texts. Each of the forty-two chapters is a self-contained instructional unit, with challenging exercises carefully tailored to reflect the vocabulary and grammar learned to date. The units gradually build up the student's knowledge of declensions, tenses, and constructions by alternating emphasis on morphology and syntax. Readings become progressively more complex and, in the second half of the book, are largely based on actual texts and include unadapted passages from Xenophon, Lysias, Plato, Aristophanes, and Thucydides. Logically organized and remarkably lucid, Introduction to Attic Greek provides students with a strong grounding in the essentials of Greek grammar as well as a substantial body of vocabulary, enabling students to read, on completion of the course, a continuous text with commentary and dictionary.

Included are a concise introduction to the history of the Greek language, a composite list of verbs with principal parts, an appendix of all paradigms, Greek-English and English-Greek glossaries, and a detailed index. The book is also a useful reference work for more advanced students who discover that gaps in their knowledge of basic Greek grammar prevent accurate reading of texts.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Mattitiahu - LibraryThing

Previous Librarything reviewer Baviv aptly describes Mastronarde's approach as: "Holy crap. A bare- knuckled approach to learning a language." I recently finished reading Mastronarde's textbook and I ... Read full review

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User Review  - agriffina - LibraryThing

As explained on Amazon, this book is a thorough and up-front guide to morphology. Mastronarde does not worry about scaring students off. It's a good approach for those who already have experience in ... Read full review

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About the author (1993)

Donald J. Mastronarde is Professor of Classics at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the editor of Euripides. Phoenissae (Teubner 1988) and author of The Textual Tradition of Euripides' Phoinissai (with Jan Maarten Bremer) (California 1983), and Contact and Discontinuity: Some Conventions of Speech and Action on the Greek Tragic Stage (California 1979).

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